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Some Questions That Never Get Answered

Why do we do the things we do?  That’s a great question that often leads to defending ourselves and our actions.  But it was never that way with Jesus.  In fact, Jesus never gave us a reason for what He did.  He never suffered from the why do we do the things we do mental hangover as others often do.  No, He simply did what was right and pleasing in His Father’s sight (1 Tim. 2:3).  After all, one of the fundamental tenets of Jesus’ life and ministry can be summed up in this simple phrase:

“For I have come down from heaven, not to do My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me.” (John 6:38)

So when we look at some actions by Jesus that seem, in our eyes, to be out of character or somewhat questionable, we must realize we cannot judge the Son of God by the standards of fallen man.  We cannot ask the Lord, “Why do You do the things You do?”  As Paul said, “But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God (or to question His judgment and motives)?” (Rom. 9:20).


Why Do We Do the Things We Do?

But often, we find events in His Word that we, if in the Lord’s shoes, might have done differently.  After all, why wait two additional days before returning to Bethany to raise Lazarus from the dead (John 11:6)?  Or why speak so harshly to a woman begging for healing for her demon-possessed daughter (Matt. 15:22-23)?  Or why, when Jesus saw His disciples struggling in the storm, does it say He “would have passed them by” (Mark 6:48)?  Doesn’t it seem cold to just walk on by while Your disciples struggle?  But He must have had a reason, although it is not revealed to us in Scripture.

The same can be said of what we know about His relationship with John the Baptist after the baptism.  On the surface, it seems a bit callous.  We see Jesus “coming towards” John (John 1:29), and yet He doesn’t stop to speak to John at all.  And then later, two of John’s disciples follow Jesus, but John does not, and Jesus never invites him to (John 1:37).  Wonder why?

And then, there is the statement made by Jesus about John the Baptist after those sent from John had departed (Matt. 11:7).  It was almost like Jesus intentionally didn’t want John to know the wonderful things He said about Him.  Again, wonder why?

Remember, it is learning how to ask these kinds of questions that will grow your experience in His Word to depths you may have never been before.  So join with us as we strive together to experience His Word.


Leaving Laodicea | The Survival Manual for the Coming Underground Church

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