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Four Verbs, Part One

Four Verbs, Part One

To know wisdom and instruction,
To perceive the words of understanding,
To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, judgment, and equity;
To give prudence to the simple, to the young man knowledge and discretion.
Proverbs 1:2-4

As we dig deeper into the Proverbs we quickly come across a few arresting verbs: know, perceive, receive, and give.  And, of course, we see the corresponding nouns associated with each of these verbs. In Proverbs 1:2-4 we find:

To know wisdom and instruction,
To perceive the words of understanding,
To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, judgment, and equity
To give prudence to the simple (and to give) to the young man knowledge and discretion.

Notice, if you will, the natural progression of action.  To know, then to perceive something, then to choose to personally receive and embrace what we now know and perceive, and finally to share, to give what we have now received to someone else.

But what does it mean to perceive something or someone, maybe a new truth or a deeper understanding of a known truth?  And how does someone then receive that true or understanding to themselves that they have just perceived?  What does that process look like?  And how does that exchange actually happen?  And finally, ultimately, to whom do we give what we have received? And what specifically do we give them?

The answer is found in the nouns connected with our actions, our verbs.

But let’s begin by looking at the four verbs.


To Know

From our previous studies we determined that to “know” (yada) means we are “to know something in a completed sense, to know everything and to know fully, to learn to know; it means to know by intimate experience or expression; to choose, to approve, to love, to embrace, to desire, to place one’s favor upon.”  It’s a deeply personal kind of knowledge forged by one’s choice, affection, conviction and experience.  And Proverbs 1:2 says we are to “know” (yada) in an intimate, personal way, both “wisdom and instruction”— wisdom being more than the raw accumulation of facts but the ability to properly apply those facts and convictions, reinforced by our choices and experiences, in order to determine what is the right and God-honoring course of action.  And instruction is defined as “correction, discipline, and chastening, as a loving father disciplines his own son.”

In essence, God has provided for us in His Son both the wisdom of God (1 Cor. 1:30) and the steady hand of correction and discipline to make sure we know (yada) God’s Word and how to apply what we know (yada) in our everyday choices that will either bring Him glory or disrepute.  Therefore, if you find yourself convicted and troubled by the words you read, rejoice!— for that’s God’s very intention.  After all, the Lord only chastises those He loves as a father disciplines his own son.

My son, do not despise the chastening of the LORD, nor detest His correction; (why) for whom the LORD loves He corrects, (to what extent) just as a father the son in whom he delights (Prov. 3:11-12).


To Perceive

Next, we are to “the words of understanding” (Prov. 1:2).  To perceive (biyn) is “to discern, to observe, to have insight into, to consider diligently.”  It involves more than mere head knowledge.  To perceive is to have a truth suddenly become alive and real to you.  It’s like our blinders are removed or the fog clears and we can see God’s Word, the “words of understanding” clearly, and then exclaim, “Geez, it was right before my eyes all the time and I just didn’t see it.  How could I have been so blind?”

And what do we now see with 20/20 vision?  The “words of understanding” or literally the “words of comprehension, discernment, righteous actions with a strong moral and religious connotation.”  In other words, we now see clearly the holiness of God.  We comprehend our sinfulness and God’s perfection and His wonderful gift of grace.  By virtue of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit we now have discernment to be able to choose what is “true, noble, just, pure, lovely, of good report, virtuous, and praiseworthy” (Phil. 4:8) and not follow our lusts or waste our lives living for the things that won’t last.  And we can now clearly choose to ” walk in the Spirit, and not fulfill the lust of the flesh” (Gal. 5:16).

What a blessing it is to be able to perceive the things of God and then have the freedom and ability to choose to follow Him, no matter what.


To Receive

But knowing, even to the point of having an “a-ha” moment when you perceive, deep down, something overwhelming and potentially life-changing, is not enough.  You have to then choose to receive, or “to take in, to lay hold of, to seize, to get or fetch, to acquire by any means possible” what you now comprehend in a deeper fashion.  Just knowing truth won’t cut it, you have to voluntarily choose to move from where you are to where the truth takes you.  You have to open up yourself, make yourself vulnerable, humble yourself, and receive the “instruction (or, discipline, correction, chastening) of wisdom” (Prov. 1:3).

It’s like salvation.  Just knowing facts about Jesus won’t bring you into eternal fellowship with Him.  You must receive Him into your life on His terms, which are all or nothing.  You must die, you must be crucified with Him, and He must live within you and through you (Gal. 2:20).  You must follow His path, the narrow gate, and not the wide road of your own choosing (Matt. 7:13-14).  He must be Lord, and not just your personal Savior that you can call on whenever you need Him to get you out of a jam (Rom. 10:9).  He is not your co-pilot, He is God Almighty, Creator of all, and Sovereign in all things.

If just knowing were enough Satan would spend eternity in heaven.  After all, he knows as fact what we believe on faith.  He knows Jesus died and was raised from the dead.  He was there, he saw, and trembled.  But Satan refuses to do the one thing that comes with receiving Jesus on His terms, and that is to bow his knee in submission to Christ and declare Him as Lord (Phil. 2:9-11).  And this is all part of receiving Christ on His terms.

But what do we receive when we receive the “instruction of wisdom”?  Solomon begins to expand our understanding of all that comes with God’s wisdom by using the terms, “justice, judgment, and equity.”

Justice is defined as “righteousness, or what is right, just or normal” with God.  It means having a “right relation to an ethical or legal standard, to be right or straight.”  In essence, it’s understanding the commands and laws of God and then choosing to align our life, both internal and external, to be in obedience to the Word of God.  It’s the desire, and the ability to now choose to serve Christ and not our flesh or the god of this fallen world.  And this ability to live according to our new nature found in Christ is just another gift given us by the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit (2 Cor. 5:17).

Remember the words of Jesus: “But why do you call Me ‘Lord, Lord,’ and not do the things which I say?” (Luke 6:46).  Great question.  Because now, through the Holy Spirit we have the ability, the freedom, and the power to choose to obey Christ.  We can live, as the Proverbs promise, a life of justice, being in a “right relation” to the commands and person of Christ.  All we have to do is choose what is right, choose the straight and narrow path.  And it’s just that simple.

Hard?  You bet.  But simple, nonetheless.

Next, we choose to receive in our lives the instruction, correction, and discipline of judgment.  This word denotes the “act of deciding a legal case in a court or in litigation before judges.”  It deals with the “ability to make a correct judgment on human actions.”

Whoa.  Hold on right there.  One of the sincerely held convictions of our fallen, politically correct culture is to not judge.  You don’t judge me and I won’t judge you.  It’s the old “don’t ask, don’t tell” mantra”  In fact, these words of Jesus, taken totally out of context, are proclaimed as absolute truth by those who reject the rest of His words as truth: “Judge not, that you be not judged” (Matt. 7:1).

So how can a Believer receive the “instruction of judgment” and still find favor in the eyes of the world?  You can’t.  Get used to it and resolve yourself to a life of turmoil and tribulation and persecution if you choose to live in the center of His will.  In fact, embrace the trials you’ll face.  Why?  Because Jesus promised great blessings to those who suffer persecution for His name sake.  Remember?  “Rejoice and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you” (Matt. 5:12).

Plus, we’re promised “all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution” (2 Tim. 3:12).  There’s no way around it.  It’s a given.  Done deal.  The only way to escape persecution is to not desire to live Godly in Christ, which produces it’s own set of horrific consequences.  Trust me, you don’t want to go down that path.

So with wisdom comes the ability to see what is right and wrong, good and evil, true and false.  The “instruction of judgment” means being able to discern genuineness from hypocrisy, good fruit from bad fruit, true prophets from false prophets, in others as well as within ourselves (Matt. 7:15-20).  And, as you would imagine, this aspect of wisdom can bring with it the unintended consequences of being called judgmental, unloving, a hater, bigoted, narrow-minded, and much more.  Hence, the warning from Jesus about suffering persecution for His name’s sake.

Finally, we receive in wisdom, in Christ, the “instruction of equity.” But what does equity mean?  Equity is defined as “evenness, fairness, uprightness, straightness, smoothness, and points to what is just, correct, right and fair in speech or actions” (Isa. 33:15).  It’s dealing with others as you would have them deal with you (Luke 6:21).  It’s being fair, honest, noble, and upright in everything. In a word, it’s the overflow of a life found “in Christ”.


To Give

But what about the fourth verb?  What about the command to give?

That’s a rather complex subject dealing with what we’re to give and to whom?  And that’s a topic we’ll look at next time in Four Verbs, Part Two.

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Getting Serious

1.  Where are you in the process of obtaining wisdom?
2.  Have you passed from simply knowing (yada) to now perceiving something deeper in the Word of God?
3.  Has God begun to speak to you in a personal, profound way through His Word and the Holy Spirit?  Have you ever had a rhema, a word from Him meant only for you?  And if so, when was that?  And what did He say?
4.  Do you remember when you received Jesus as Lord?  What was that like?  And what has your life with Him been like since that momentous day?
5.  On a scale from 1 to 10, how would you rate God’s wisdom in your life right now and in your decision making process? What was it yesterday? Are you growing in the wisdom of God? Is He more real to you today than in the past? And, if not, why not?


Next Step Challenge

Since receiving the wisdom of God is tied to receiving Christ Jesus as Lord and the Holy Spirit coming as the guarantee of your future inheritance in Him (Eph. 1:3-4), write down your salvation experience.  Include the time when you knew regeneration took place and your life was now hid in Him (Col. 3:3).  Include also your spiritual journey since salvation.

What have you learned from your walk with Him about wisdom?  Have you personally experienced the process outlined in Proverbs 1:1-4 about knowing, perceiving, and receiving?  What was that like?  What was the actual context in which God revealed to you His wisdom?  What was the outcome of that encounter?

And if you haven’t experienced any of this with the Lord, why?  Is the problem with Him?  Does He show favoritism or partiality and is withholding something from you that He’s freely giving to others?

Or is the problem you?  And, if so, that’s a sobering thought, isn’t it?

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Wisdom is a Choice, So Choose Wisely

Wisdom is a Choice, So Choose Wisely

To know wisdom and instruction, to perceive the words of understanding,
To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, judgment, and equity.
Proverbs 1:2-3

The question often asked is how Solomon received the wisdom of God?  How did all that come about?  What was the experience like?  What was the process?

From the account in 1 Kings we find little to shed light on the specific details of that momentous event.  What we do see is Solomon overwhelmed with the responsibility of leading the kingdom he inherited from his father David and recognizing he is but “a little child; I do not know how to go out or come in” (1 Kings 3:7).  Then, in a marvelous way, God grants his request and gives him, not only a “wise and understanding heart” (1 Kings 3:12), but also throws in what Solomon didn’t ask for, “both riches and honor” (1 Kings 3:13) simply because He wanted to.

And from then on we see Solomon acting, sometimes, in the wisdom God gave him and, at other times, living like a rich, spoiled brat making “dumb as a brick” decisions for himself, his family, and the nation God trusted him to lead.

But how is that possible?  How can a man given the very wisdom of God make dumb, lousy, selfish decisions?  Didn’t God make Solomon a wise man when He gave him His wisdom?  Didn’t God just zap him, like He did Saul of Tarsus on the Damascus road, and turn him into something he wasn’t before?  Or maybe God simply enhanced the wisdom Solomon already possessed?  Maybe Solomon was already a wise man and God just gave him the 2.0 update?  Plus, when God gives you or me His wisdom, does that mean everything we do or say is wise and from God?  And if not, why?  How can we, like Solomon, be given the wisdom of God and then go around making lame, stupid decisions?  How is that even possible?


Solomon Was Not a Wise Man

Let’s nip this one in the bud right out of the gate.  Solomon was not an inherently wise man.  He was not one whose very nature oozed wisdom.  How could he be?  The decisions and choices he made as a father, husband and king are anything but wise and they reflect his true nature.  When Solomon relied on the wisdom of God, he made incredibly wise decisions— some of which we still marvel at today.  But when left to himself Solomon, like you and me, made decisions and choices according to his own nature, according to what he was made of on the inside.  And for Solomon, his nature was anything but wise.

Just think, how wise was it as a husband to have 300 wives and 700 concubines?  How wise was that?  Think of the infighting within his own family.  Think of how used and rejected his wives felt, not to mention the concubines.  And this selfish, unwise decision to marry so many women wasn’t a momentary lapse of reason for Solomon.  It wasn’t something he did and regretted later, vowing to never make the same mistake again.  This pattern of thinking was habitual, ingrained, and occurred over a 1,000 times.

Then you have the children.  Hatred, jealousy, bigotry, and bitterness was the rule of the day, so much so that the kingdom was irreparably torn in two after Solomon’s death by two of his own children.  What does this show us about Solomon’s nature and core values regarding his responsibilities of being a father?  Where’s the wisdom in any of this?

Finally, how did Solomon the spiritual leader do?  Horrible.  He allowed his many wives to desecrate the sanctity of his own home, the holiness of the Temple of God and the very nation by building altars to their foreign gods and bringing idolatry into the land.  How could Solomon allow this to take place under his watch?  How can one man be so wise and yet fail so miserably?  Solomon’s true nature reveals the carnality, apathy, and weakness of Solomon the man, and not the inherent wisdom often attributed to him.


Wisdom is a Choice

The wisdom Solomon received from the Lord is the same thing you and I receive in Christ.  Solomon received wisdom but you and I receive Christ into our lives, “who became for us wisdom from God” (1 Cor. 1:30).  And then, once we’ve received Christ, it’s up to us to live and “walk in the Spirit, and you shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh” (Gal. 5:16).  Like with Solomon, it becomes a choice.  A simple, but difficult choice.

When we choose to live according to the new nature within us, according to the wisdom given to us by Christ and administered by the Holy Spirit, we will naturally make wise decisions.  Why?  Because we are “walking in the Spirit” (Gal. 5:16) and have the “mind of Christ” (1 Cor. 2:16).  But when we choose to go our own way, to call the shots as we see fit, or to live according to the flesh, we can expect our end to be the same as Solomon’s.  Remember, it’s a choice, the exercise of our free will: to choose either the blessings of a life of submission to Christ or the heartache of a life brought on by the rebellion of our flesh.

It’s a choice— your choice.  So choose wisely.

And once you’ve chosen wisely, your job’s not done.  You still have to act on that choice.  Look at the transition about wisdom in Proverbs 1:2-3.

To know wisdom and instruction, to perceive the words of understanding,
To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, judgment, and equity.

First we are “to know” wisdom in Proverbs 1:2 and then “to receive the instruction of wisdom” in the next verse.  We go from knowing to receiving in the space of 20 words.  One is an understanding of something and the other is a choice, literally an action based on that choice— the receiving of something found only in Him.  We can “know” wisdom, or Christ, truth, right from wrong, good and evil, up from down, and all sorts of wonderful things, and yet still choose to live contrary to what we “know” and suffer, like Solomon, the horrific consequences of that choice.  Or, we can know the truth and choose the truth and be set free by the truth (John 8:32).  It’s really that simple.

Easy?  No.  Simple?  Absolutely.


Wisdom is a Gift

In other words, the wisdom Solomon received from the Lord is the same wisdom available to each of us today by the residing presence of the Holy Spirit.  And we already have in us, available to us, the same wisdom of God given to Solomon.  How?  By virtue of being “in Christ” who “became for us wisdom from God” (1 Cor. 1:30).  The key to living in the gift of wisdom already given us boils down to what we do with that gift?  Do we “receive (or choose to receive) the instruction (or, discipline, correction, chastisement) of wisdom” (Prov. 1:3) or do we hide it away and let it die from inactivity and lack of use?  Jesus said we are the “light of the world” and He commands us to place that light, our lives, including His wisdom and redeeming power and grace in us, like a lamp on the table for the whole world to see (Matt. 5:14-16).

Remember, it’s more than just “knowing”— it’s “receiving” and having the discipline (instruction) to obey what we’ve received.


It Comes in One Package

Plus, it all comes in one package.  Consider, for example, the passage in Galatians where it says the “works (plural) of the flesh are evident” (Gal. 5:19-21) and then goes on to list them, one by one: adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lewdness, idolatry, sorcery, hatred, and the like.  But these “works” or “deeds” of the flesh are freestanding, independent, and are not part of a combined package.  You can have one or more of these but not necessarily all.  You can commit, for example, adultery but not murder.  Have hatred and selfish ambition, but not idolatry or sorcery.  Why?  Because the word “works” or “deeds” is plural, meaning many— that’s many individual works and not one work made up of many individual parts.  Do you see the difference?

But the “fruit” of the Spirit is just the opposite.  It’s singular, just one fruit, made up of a combination of nine different attributes: love (agape), joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control (Gal. 5:22-23).  You get one, you get them all.  They come in a package.  It’s all or nothing.

And this is how we receive wisdom from the Lord.  We receive Jesus, the one fruit, and all the attributes or the fullness of the Godhead that dwell in Him bodily.  And we, being “in Christ” are complete in Him (Col. 2:9-10).

So you and I have the same Spirit, the same wisdom, made available and given to Solomon.  All we have to do is rely on that wisdom, who is the residing presence of the Holy Spirit, for God’s wisdom to manifest itself in us.

Again, it’s just that simple.  Difficult?  Yes.  But simple, nonetheless.


So What Happened to Solomon?

The same things that happened to each of us when we received Christ as Lord and the Holy Spirit came to make us His home, or to abide, in us.  When He came, so did His wisdom.  It’s always there, always available, always ready.  Solomon received what we’ve received, but in part.  He received wisdom.  But we, on the other hand, have received Christ, who became for us “the wisdom from God” (1 Cor. 1:30)— but also so much more.

We just need, maybe even more than Solomon did, to rest in His wisdom and to “walk (think, live, and choose) according to the Spirit, (why) and you shall not fulfill (like Solomon) the lust of the flesh” (Gal. 5:16).

Are you ready?  Then let’s get started living in the inheritance and wisdom God has already provided us as “joint heirs with Christ” (Rom. 8:17).

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Getting Serious

1.  Did you ever wonder how Solomon was given the wisdom from God?  And, did you ever want to know how that same wisdom could be given to you?
2.  Did you ever think the wisdom given to Solomon was something only given to special saints and not to ordinary, everyday people like you and me?  And, if so, why did you think that?
3.  How does it make you feel to know, or at least to entertain the thought, that you already possess the wisdom Solomon had by virtue of the Holy Spirit living in you?  In fact, by being “in Christ” you possess much more than Solomon.  How does that make you feel?
4.  Let me ask this again: When was the last time God spoke to you through His Word?  What was that experience like?  How often does it happen?
5.  On a scale from 1 to 10, how would you rate God’s wisdom in your life right now and in your decision making process?  What was it yesterday?  Are you growing in the wisdom of God?  And, if not, why?


Next Step Challenge

Take your Bible and look up at least 25 passages where the term “in Christ” is used.  What do they say about your life right now?  For starters, you can begin with four verses from Romans provided below.

Romans 6:11 – Likewise you also, reckon yourselves to be dead indeed to sin, but alive to God (how) in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Romans 6:23 – For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life (how) in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Romans 8:1 – There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are (what) in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.

Romans 12:5 – So we, being many, are one body (how) in Christ, and individually members of one another.

And how will you let what you’ve learned change your life from this point forward?

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How to Become a “Wise Guy”

How to Become a “Wise Guy”

To know wisdom and instruction, to perceive the words of understanding.
Proverbs 1:2

In Proverbs 1:2 we’ve discovered one of the great goals of the book of Proverbs is to allow us to know, in an intimate and experiential sense, both wisdom and instruction.  We’ve already looked at what the word know means in this passage in yesterday’s post.  But what about wisdom?  And instruction?

Wisdom is defined as “the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgment, or the quality of being wise.  It’s the ability to discern or judge what is right, true, and lasting.”  Wisdom is not the mere accumulation of facts about someone or something, it’s the ability to properly apply those facts in a given situation to determine the right and God-honoring outcome.  Wisdom is manifested when a person can see the circumstances they face and match them with truth they know, God’s Word, and then plot a course of action based on the truth and not on the urgency of the situation.

Instruction, surprisingly, is not primarily defined as teaching or exhortation, as we would expect.  Instruction (muwcar) is defined as discipline, chastening, and correction, with the imagery of a father disciplining his son.  So the book of Proverbs is designed to help us know (yada) by doing, to learn by experience, in an intimate, personal way, the ability to discern what is right, true, and lasting versus choosing the cheap trinkets and toys our culture offers.  And we are to learn the wisdom of God by discipline, correction and chastening.  After all, the Lord disciplines the ones He loves (Heb. 12:6).


How to Get Wisdom

And that’s a question we all ask, isn’t it?  How do we get wisdom?  There are several verses that speak to this desire.  The most well-known is found in James:

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all liberally and without reproach, and it will be given to him. But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for he who doubts is like a wave of the sea driven and tossed by the wind. For let not that man suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways (James 1:5-8).

As we can see, wisdom is given to anyone who asks, just as long as they ask in faith.  For if they doubt when they ask, they shouldn’t expect to receive anything from the Lord.  Why?  Because they are “double-minded” and “unstable” in all their ways.

So let me get this straight.  All we have to do is ask for wisdom, for God’s wisdom— like something He possesses within Himself, as a part of Himself— and He will lavishly give His wisdom to us, to anyone for that matter, just as long as we ask in faith, without doubting.  And why would God do that?  Is it because He has a great desire for us to be wise?  Or, maybe He wants His church and His children to be known as the wisest in all the land and show the world what it looks like to belong to Him?  Or again, maybe He doesn’t relish the idea of His children struggling to make sense of the fallen world He placed us in?

But that can’t be true.  Why?  Because the Lord tells us a few verses earlier to “count it all joy when you fall into various trials” that we obviously didn’t have the wisdom to see or avoid in the first place (James 1:2).  Plus, the word fall implies stepping into a hole we either didn’t know to look out for or we weren’t wise enough to step over.

Talk about not having wisdom.  Also, if it’s really just that easy, then what’s the point of the book of Proverbs?  If all we have to do is pray and the wisdom update is automatically downloaded, why would we need the instruction manual?  Can we really become Yoda by just asking?


Wisdom is Found in Just One Man

But if we keep looking for the true meaning of wisdom in His Word, we will soon find ourselves walking through the pages of 1 Corinthians and find:

But of Him you are in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God— and righteousness and sanctification and redemption (1 Cor. 1:30).

Now, what does this mean?  Exactly what it says.  Jesus, by His own doing, has literally become for us the “wisdom from God.”  So when we see Jesus we see, in perfect clarity, all the “wisdom from God.”  If we want to know (yada) the “wisdom from God” all we need to do is know (yada) the Son of God.  Since Jesus has “become for us wisdom for God” we need only to look and learn from Him to have that wondrous wisdom.  Don’t you see?  If we want more wisdom, we must seek and ask for more of Jesus.

The answer for our lack of wisdom is more Jesus.  It’s all about Jesus.

So when James speaks of asking God for wisdom and knowing God gives “liberally and without reproach” to all who ask, He just may be speaking of the wisdom found in Jesus.  Or, he may just be speaking about Jesus Himself.

Consider this:

If any of you lacks wisdom (what Jesus literally became for us), let him ask God (for more of Jesus, for the revelation of Jesus, to receive Jesus) who gives (Jesus) to all (“Come unto Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden” – Matt. 11:28) liberally and without reproach (there is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus – Rom. 8:1), and it will be given to him (to make us complete in Christ – Col. 2:10).

After all, Jesus has become for us “wisdom from God — and righteousness, and sanctification and redemption” (1 Cor. 1:30).  Jesus is all in all.


To Know Wisdom is to Know Jesus

When Proverbs 1 states the main purpose of the book is for us to know (yada) wisdom, we’re also talking about knowing Jesus and the life in Christ and how to live in Him in a practical, hands-on, everyday sense.  Proverbs gives us instruction on Godly living, and examples on how to put into practice the wisdom found in Christ.  After all, He’s our perfect example, tested and tempted in every way we are, yet without sin (Heb. 4:15).

Just think, when we want to know how to respond to someone who verbally attacks our loved ones, what do we do?  We look to Jesus, the “author and finisher of our faith” (Heb. 12:2), and see how He responded in the same situation.  We see His perfect example and, like true disciples, follow Him.  He becomes for us the “wisdom from God” (1 Cor. 1:30).  When our rights are violated and we scream for justice or vengeance, what should we do?  We look to Jesus to see how He responded in the same situation.  And we do what He did.  We learn from Him.  We learn His wisdom by learning more about Him, walking with Him, and choosing to live like Him.

This is what it means to know (yada) wisdom and instruction.  It means to know (yada) Jesus (wisdom) and to be disciplined (instruction), or disciples of His.  And the answer to our lack of wisdom is, as always, our lack of Jesus.

And the reason for the Proverbs?  Simply this, to give us hands on examples of how Jesus would handle a situation that wasn’t recorded in the Bible.  For example, how would Jesus handle sexual temptation?  Or was He even tempted in that way?

But you’ll have to wait until tomorrow to see how the Proverbs complete the life of Christ not recorded for us in the Gospels.

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Getting Serious

1. What does it mean for you, in a practical sense, to see Jesus as the wisdom from God (Col. 1:30)?
2. Do you have the wisdom of God? How would you know?
3. Since instruction in our passage primarily means discipline, how disciplined are you in your walk with Christ? Do you have daily time with Him? When? Where? And how long?
4. Can you remember an example of God giving you His wisdom at just the right time? What was that experience like? How often does it happen?
5. On a scale from 1 to 10, how would you rate God’s wisdom in your life and in your decision making process? What was it three months ago? One year ago? Are you growing in His wisdom or are you stagnated?


Next Step Challenge

Take a Bible Concordance or an online source like www.blueletterbible.com and do a search of the word wisdom in both the Old and the New Testament. Write down at least 20 passages that speak to you personally. Do you see any difference between the description of wisdom in the Old versus the New Testament? And, if so, what are those differences?

Why did you choose the 20 passages that you did? What has the Lord shown you through your word search and those 20 passages?

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326:  The Two Calls of Christ

326: The Two Calls of Christ

In our Christian life we find the Lord gives us two calls or two personal invitations.  The first invitation is found in Matthew 11:28-30 where He says, “Come to Me.”  This is the call to salvation, to the binding of ourselves to Christ and to become one with Him.

The second call comes after salvation and it is the invitation to a life of unbroken intimacy with Christ.  That call is found in John 15:4 where He says, “Abide in Me.”

“Come to Me.”
“Abide in Me.”

There’s so much to learn from these two simple invitations that will literally change the life of a believer.  Which begs the question: Do you want your life changed to be more like Him?  If so, then by all means, please keep listening.

The following is a study on John 15:4 and Matthew 13:28-30.

To download the slides for this message, click – HERE

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325:   He is De-Vine and We are De-Branch

325: He is De-Vine and We are De-Branch

From John 15:

John 15:1 – “I am (Jesus) the true (or, genuine, perfect, real, essential, enduring, not true as opposed to false) vine and My Father (God the Father) is the vinedresser (or, farmer, gardener, husbandman, a tiller of the soil, a vine keeper).”

But it gets better.

John 15:2 – “Every (or, all, each and every one, the whole, in totality, lacking none) branch in (abiding in) Me (Jesus) that does not bear fruit He (the Vinedresser) takes away (or, lifts up, elevates, raises up, to raise from the ground, to carry, to bear, to remove from its place); and every (or, all, each and every one, the whole, in totality, lacking none) branch that bears fruit He (the Vinedresser) prunes (or, cleans, makes pure, spotless, and without stain; to purify from filth, to cleanse from defilement), (why) that it may bear more fruit.”

And then the key word:  abide.  To abide means “to remain, to rest, to dwell, to live.  Also, to spend time, to continue steadfast, to persevere, to tarry, to continue, to remain in or with someone, to remain united with someone, being of one heart, one mind, and one will.  It defines something that remains where it is, continues in a fixed state, or endures.”

Want to know more?  Then keep listening.

The following is a study on John 15:1-3.

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