Welcome to Leaving Laodicea

The Survival Manual for the Coming Underground Church
Prayer: Ephesians 3:6-7 – Effective Working of His Power

Prayer: Ephesians 3:6-7 – Effective Working of His Power

As we prepare to close out this section of Scripture, I want to remind you that the seven verses that begin Ephesians 3 are all one long sentence.  Therefore, it is difficult to understand the whole without examining each individual part.  And it is equally difficult to understand the various parts, or verses, unless we first have a grasp of the entire meaning of this single sentence.  It seems this sentence has at its beginning and end two bookends displaying both the humility of Paul and the grace given him by the Lord.  We find these two bookends revealed in the word: given.

Paul begins with the “dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you” (Eph. 3:2) and ends with “I became a minister according to the gift of the grace of God given to me” (Eph. 3:7).  In both instances, Paul humbly reflects he was nothing more than the blessed recipient of something from God given to him for the sake of someone else.  In this case, the Gentiles.  But he ends by stating the gift given him, his calling into the ministry, was only accomplished by “the effective working of His power” and for no other reason (Eph. 3:7).  So both the gift and the effectiveness of Paul’s ministry, is all according to God, and not of any inherent merit of Paul.

Of which I became a minister according to the gift of the grace of God given to me by the effective working of His power – Ephesians 3:7.

Paul claims his calling to be a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ is a gift from God.  He never ceased to be amazed that God took someone like him, a murdering, vile, angry, detestable, blaspheming Pharisee, and turned him into not only a believer, but one called to minister to the Gentiles (Acts 13:46).

Paul understood everything that happened in his life was because of grace.  God gave him the grace of revelation to be able to tell the Gentiles about the “unsearchable riches of Christ” (Eph. 3:8).  But God also called him into service as a minister of Christ and a servant of others, which gave his life more meaning and purpose than anything else, ever.  His old life as a Jew, “born in Tarsus of Cilicia, but brought up at the feet of Gamaliel, taught according to the strictness of our fathers’ law” (Acts 22:3) meant nothing now.  Compared to the Lord’s gift of ministry and revelation, Paul considered it, like all things, “rubbish” – save for the “excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord” (Phil. 3:8).

read more
Prayer: Ephesians 3:5 – Hide and Seek

Prayer: Ephesians 3:5 – Hide and Seek

One of the most amazing privileges of being a Christian is knowing the answers to the so-called hidden mysteries of life God reveals to us in His Word.  Philosophers spend a lifetime trying to determine the meaning of life, and we already know.  Artists and musicians try to capture the image of true, faithful, unselfish love in their paintings and music, and we have an unrivaled masterpiece of love on display in the person of Jesus Christ.

The answer to all of life’s mysteries or hidden truths are available to us because we are beloved children of the Most High – which is one of the most glorious blessings of being in Christ.

Today, we are using Ephesians 3:5 to help focus our prayer time with the Lord.  This passage reads:

Which in other ages was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed by the Spirit to His holy apostles and prophets.

We know, of course, this specific mystery has to do with both Jews and Gentiles making up the church together.  But the underlying principle is the fact there is a truth God has chosen to keep hidden from men for thousands of years for His own purpose.  And now, by the Spirit living in each of us, He has decided to reveal His heart and plan to those who belong to Him.  Not to everyone, just to those He calls His children (Rom. 8:16-17).

read more
Prayer: Ephesians 3:3 – Elementary, My Dear Watson

Prayer: Ephesians 3:3 – Elementary, My Dear Watson

The world is full of mysteries. Some have piqued our interest and baffled our imaginations for generations.  They are fascinating, yet remain elusive and unexplainable.  For example, we wonder at the origin of Stonehenge.  Or how an ancient culture had the technology to build the Great Pyramids in Egypt.  Or how to explain the Loch Ness Monster.  Is there life on other planets?  What happened to the city of Atlantis?  For the more practical and political student of current mysteries, who was the shooter on the grassy knoll?  What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?  And the list of mysteries is endless, and the answers few.  But that is the nature of a mystery.

But in the New Testament, the word mystery is not something unknowable, but something always known but only revealed to certain people at a pre-determined time, all decided by our Sovereign God.

The verse we will use to focus our prayer time is Ephesians 3:3-4, which reads:

How that by revelation He made known to me the mystery (as I have briefly written already, by which, when you read, you may understand my knowledge in the mystery of Christ).

Take a moment and reflect on the word, mystery. Let your mind explore all the images the word conjures up for you.  We know the mystery spoken in this passage is that Gentiles, along with God’s chosen people, the Jews, are both now citizens in the Kingdom of God.  This truth, ordained by God from the foundation of time, was hidden from the Jews and Gentiles until revealed to Paul— which is precisely what this verse says.  That “by revelation He (God) made known to me (Paul) the mystery” which reveals the Kingdom of God to be inclusive of both Jews and Gentiles who have been chosen and redeemed by the blood of Christ.  It’s a picture of God sovereignly choosing out of two ethnic groups, Jews and Gentiles, those who belong to Him, and creating a new race, a new family, a new people, all redeemed by Christ.

read more
Prayer: Ephesians 3:3-4 – The Gift of God’s Revelation

Prayer: Ephesians 3:3-4 – The Gift of God’s Revelation

Yesterday, we looked at the word dispensation, which can be translated steward or stewardship, and speaks of our responsibility to complete the task God has given us to do.  We also focused our prayers on Ephesians 3:2, which deals specifically with the dispensation of God’s grace given to Paul for the sake of the Gentiles.

But today, we will look at the next phrase, Ephesians 3:3-4, which reads:

How that by revelation He made known to me the mystery (as I have briefly written already, by which, when you read, you may understand my knowledge in the mystery of Christ).

In these two verses, we find the word revelation used once and mystery used twice.  But this is not the first time Paul used these words in his letter to the Ephesians.  In Ephesians 1:17, Paul speaks of praying the Lord would give the “spirit of wisdom and revelation” in the knowledge of Christ.  And in Ephesians 1:9, we find God “having made known to us the mystery of His will, according to the good pleasure which He purposed in Himself.”

As we previously discovered, the word mystery is not something forever unknown.  Instead, it denotes “something hidden or not yet fully manifest.”  It’s knowable truth, but just not to everyone.  This mystery is a truth God has reserved to reveal at a particular time, to a specific group of people, or person, for His unique purpose.

This wondrous mystery, unknown in the Old Testament, was finally revealed to Paul by the revelation of the Holy Spirit.  And this mystery is the Kingdom of God includes, not just Jews, but also Gentiles.  That God truly is no respecter of persons (Acts 10:34-35), and the Kingdom of God is far greater than our prejudices, our racial discord, or our cultural preferences.

read more
Prayer:  Ephesians 3:2 – Time for a Fresh Start

Prayer: Ephesians 3:2 – Time for a Fresh Start

Today is the first day of a New Year.  Congratulations.  Whew, we made it.  And better than that, it’s the first day of a brand-new decade.  On January 1st, many of us tend to make resolutions we never actually keep.  Planet Fitness, for example, will be packed tomorrow with people who made a commitment today to get in shape only to find most of them gone by February 1st.  Trust me, it happens.

But that shouldn’t be the case for those of us who follow Christ.  When we make a resolution, a commitment, or a vow according to Scripture, we should rely on the Holy Spirit to help us finish what we promise to start and not try to grit it out in the flesh.  Again, I know personally how futile that can be.

The passage we are focusing our prayers on this first day of the New Year is Ephesians 3:1-2.  It reads:

For this reason I, Paul, the prisoner of Christ Jesus for you Gentiles— if indeed you have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you.

We’ve previously looked at a number of words in this passage, but today we’re going to examine the most convicting of them all, the word dispensation.  It’s a strange word seldom used today, especially in Christian circles.  In fact, the only time we hear dispensation is usually in a heated discussion between two so-called Bible scholars who have differing views of the end times.  But that discussion is for another time and place and is not how the word is used in this verse.  The word dispensation (oikonomía) means “to be a manager of a household, or the position, work, responsibility or arrangement of an administration, as of a house or of property, either one’s own or another’s.”  In other words, dispensation can be translated steward or stewardship and refers to the management of a house or business on behalf of someone else.  A steward, therefore, was responsible for taking care of something not his own, that which belonged to someone else.

When Paul is referring to “the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you” (Eph. 3:2) he was speaking about the stewardship given to him by God for proclaiming the grace revealed to Paul for the benefit of the Gentiles.  Paul had a calling and a mission, a divine mandate, a fiduciary responsibility as a steward of God, to fulfill the task God had given him to do.  And for Paul that task, according to Ephesians 3:2, was to present to the Gentiles the grace of God given and revealed to Paul for them.

read more
Prayer:  Ephesians 3:2 – The Grace Given

Prayer: Ephesians 3:2 – The Grace Given

Today is the last day of 2019 and, amazingly, the last day of the decade.  Tomorrow we will be celebrating the beginning of a New Year and the birth of 2020.  I don’t know about you, but sometimes I have a hard time believing that it’s actually 2020.  Much has happened over the last 10 years.  And, as every aging boomer bemoans, “Where has all the time gone?”

The verse we are using to help focus our prayers today is Ephesians 3:1-2, which reads:

For this reason I, Paul, the prisoner of Christ Jesus for you Gentiles— if indeed you have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you.

Tomorrow we will be looking at the word dispensation and all the truths we can discover from Paul’s use of it.  (Spoiler: They are quite challenging and convicting).  But for today, I’d like to focus on the phrase “the grace of God which was given to me for you.”  And specifically, the words grace and given.

read more
Prayer: Ephesians 3:2 – The Scary World of Evangelism

Prayer: Ephesians 3:2 – The Scary World of Evangelism

This past Sunday we talked about what it means to be a follower of Christ by slowly unpacking Matthew 16:24-25 which reads:

Then Jesus said to His disciples, “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.  For whoever desires to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.”

In this passage we focused on words like “desires” and “deny himself” and “take up his cross” in order to try to know exactly what following Jesus actually meant for His disciples then, and what it means for us today.  We then spent some time in Matthew 10 going over the costs of following Jesus and the one specific aspect of discipleship He emphasized.  And that, unfortunately for many in the church today, is evangelism.

I don’t know about you, but one of my biggest regrets as a Christian is the fact my prayer life is not what I know it could be.  Statements like “pray without ceasing” (1 Tim. 5:17) have often led to guilt and self-condemnation because of my lack of doing just that.  But my biggest blind spot as a Believer is probably my lack of witnessing or evangelism.  In fact, almost everyone that I talk to wishes they had led more people to Christ.  Do you feel the same?

read more
442:  How to Surrender Your Life to Him

442: How to Surrender Your Life to Him

We have looked at what it takes to become a Faith Prepper over the last few weeks.  We did this by learning to pray at all times by letting the Holy Spirit, through God’s Word, direct your prayers.   And we also spent some time learning how to trust at all times by allowing your faith to grow by having it exercised in often unpleasant situations.  But even with all of this, we still are plagued with a few questions.

How do we go from talking about faith to living by faith?
How do we learn to trust the Lord in all things?
How do we know and understand His will?
What are the practical steps we need to take to surrender our all to Him?
And how can we go about doing just that?

The answer, according to Scripture, is found in the single word, surrender.  It means “to yield, give up or over, submit, abandon, relinquish, cede, waive, or capitulate.  From the Christian perspective, it means to relinquish ownership of what we consider ours: our property, rights, time, decisions, future, independence, basically our life.

Surrender, like most things, is a choice.

The classic passage on total surrender is found in Galatians 2:20.  It reads: “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself for me.”

But there is so much more.

read more
Average is Not Normal

Average is Not Normal

The following is from Robertson McQuilkin in the book, Five Views of Sanctification.  This was written as a defense of the Keswick view of sanctification and I find his words incredibly enlightening.  In fact, I read this as the opening statement before my sermon on How to Surrender Your Life to the Lord that I preached this past Sunday. 

I hope it proves to be a blessing to you.



Average is Not Normal

Average is not necessarily normal. For example, the average temperature of patients in a hospital may be 100 degrees, but such a temperature is not normal. The average score for a group of friends on the golf course may be 85 for the day, but par may be only 72. So it is with the Christian life. The average experience of church members is far different from New Testament norms for the Christian life.

The normal Christian is characterized by loving responses to ingratitude and indifference, even hostility, and is filled with joy in the midst of unhappy circumstances and with peace when everything goes wrong. The normal Christian overcomes in the battle with temptation, consistently obeys the laws of God, and grows in self-control, contentment, humility, and courage. Thought processes are so under the control of the Holy Spirit and instructed by Scripture that the normal Christian authentically reflects the attitudes and behavior of Jesus Christ. God has first place in life, and the welfare of others takes precedence over personal desires. The normal Christian has power not only for godly living but for effective service in the church.  Above all, he or she has the joy of constant companionship with the Lord.

read more
Prayer:  Ephesians 3:1-2 – Not Everything is for Everybody

Prayer: Ephesians 3:1-2 – Not Everything is for Everybody

Today, before we pray, we will look at some qualifiers in this passage and elsewhere in Scripture.  What do I mean by qualifies?  They are simply statements in the Word of God designed to let the reader know the promise is not meant for everyone.  It is a blanket divider that separates those who are predestined to hear and understand, and those who are not.  Let me show you how this plays out in Ephesians 3:1-2, which reads:

For this reason I, Paul, the prisoner of Christ Jesus for you Gentiles— if indeed you have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you – Ephesians 3:1-2.

Paul begins by describing himself as “the prisoner of Christ Jesus for you Gentiles” and then goes on to divide the Gentiles into two camps (Eph. 3:1).  One, those who “have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you” (Eph. 3:2).  And two, those who have not heard.  Or, by implication, have not heard and believed.  So Paul is saying the “dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you” only means the Gentiles who have heard of this or have had their spirits quickened to the truth.  It is a truth proclaimed for everyone, but applied to only some.  Just like salvation and so many other aspects of the Christian faith.

read more

Come Join Us!

Subscribe-Leaving-Loadicea

Something About Us

This is a collection of the many questions I have struggled with and the answers I have found regarding the relationship between authentic faith in Christ and much of what is portrayed today as Biblical Christianity.  Especially with the coming darkness looming over all of us, including the church.

Come with me.  It should be a wild ride!

To find out more about us and what we believe, just continue reading…

Sit down and let's talk.

“I know your works, that you are neither cold nor hot. I could wish you were cold or hot.  So then, because you are lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will vomit you out of My mouth.  Because you say, ‘I am rich, have become wealthy, and have need of nothing’—and do not know that you are wretched, miserable, poor, blind, and naked.”

Revelation 3:15-17

Come Join Us

Come and join us as we discover the joy of Leaving Laodicea behind.