The Price of Extravagant Worship

The Price of Extravagant Worship

Sometimes, as true followers of Jesus, we have to stand alone.

Now I’m not talking about standing alone against the onslaught of evil in our society or the corrupt individuals in our government or even the forces of darkness that align themselves against us. No, I mean to “stand alone” when it comes to worshiping our Lord in the manner He is most pleased with, in a way that brings Him the most glory.

Let me explain.

True Worshipers vs False Worshipers

When Jesus was confronting the Samaritan woman at the well in Sychar He made a statement about true worship that has rocked me to my very core.  And it should have the same effect on you if you are one of those who truly desires to leave the spiritual lukewarmness of our Laodicean heritage that has become the mainstay of much of what we call church today.  His words have put a longing in my heart for more of Him, that “I may know (1097 – ginōskō) Him and the power (1411 – dynamis) of His resurrection, and the fellowship (2842 – koinōnia) of His sufferings” (Phil. 3:10).  And it’s my prayer His words will do the same for you.

So what exactly did Jesus say to the woman at the well?

Their discussion was about worship.  The woman was playing on the inherent prejudice between Jews and Samaritans regarding the location where proper worship should take place, either on Mt. Gerizim or in Jerusalem (John 4:20).  But Jesus would not be goaded into a fruitless argument. Instead, He said:

“Woman, believe Me, the hour is coming when you will neither on this mountain, nor in Jerusalem, worship (4352 – proskyneō) the Father.  You worship (4352) what you do not know (1492 – eidō); we know (1492) what we worship (4352), for salvation is of the Jews.  But the hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers will worship (4352) the Father in spirit and truth; for the Father is seeking (2212 – zēteō) such to worship (4352) Him” (John 4:21-23).

Did you catch that?  Jesus said the hour is coming when the true worshipers, as compared to false worshipers, would worship the Father in spirit and truth and that the Father is actively seeking true worshipers to worship Him that way.  In other words, there is a type of person who worships the Lord in a way He actively seeks, that He earnestly desires, that He is striving to find.  And it’s possible, even probable, for you and I to become that type of worshiper.

But what does that mean?  And what does that look like?  And what does that have to do with “standing alone” in regards to true worship?

Standing Alone in Worship

Fast forward a year or so and we now find Jesus coming back to Bethany just six days before His last passover.  He’s at a party given by Simon the Leper (Matt. 26:10) along with Lazarus and his two sisters, Mary and Martha (John 12:1-2), and His disciples.  After supper, Mary quietly comes up behind Jesus and breaks an alabaster jar of very costly oil of spikenard and begins to anoint the head and feet of Jesus and then wipe His feet with her hair (John 12:3).  The sight of Mary’s raw, open, unashamed devotion to her Lord was unnerving to both those at the party and to us had we been there.  It’s far too extravagant, way too lavish, and an extremely unwise use of money.  It was a classic example of financial irresponsibility, especially when you consider her gift of spikenard would cost about $25,000 in today’s dollars.

In fact, those who also loved the Lord, His disciples, felt like we probably would about what Mary did.  Their conviction at her love and devotion, and embarrassment at their own lack of love and devotion quickly turned to anger, condemnation and judgmental indignation.  In fact, they called the anointing of Jesus, their Lord and Master, a “waste” and said the money could have been spent better on the poor, on a stranger, on someone less deserving that they didn’t even know (Matt. 26:8-9).

But Mary kept on worshiping her Lord by wiping His feet with her hair while the whole “house was filled with the fragrance of the oil” (John 12:3), with the sweet aroma of her worship to the One who meant more to her than life or reputation or acceptance or the approval of her family and friends.

Jesus Understood

No one came to her defense.  No one said, “Hey man, cut her some slack.  If she wants to worship our Lord that way, so be it.  It’s a free country, she can do what she wants.”  Even Peter, who just a few days later would categorically deny any knowledge of the very existence of Jesus, stood with the others in condemnation of her appalling and disgraceful actions.  And even John, the disciple “whom Jesus loved” (John 13:23), remained silent.

No one came to Mary’s defense.  No one stood by her side.  No one offered a kind word of encouragement or a nod of understanding or a polite smile.  She was standing alone among those who also loved her Lord but were indignant and resentful of the way in which she chose to express her love for her Lord.

But in the midst of that hostile crowd, someone noticed Mary.  It was the same someone who permitted her to worship Him the way she did and even defended her actions.  Jesus said, “Let her alone; she has kept this for the day of My burial.  For the poor you have with you always, but Me you do not have always” (John 12:7-8).

Jesus graciously accepted Mary’s act of worship and devotion.  He was pleased at her willingness to give so sacrificially and recognized that Mary understood the whole picture of why Jesus came, she grasped the rest of the story, she got the point.  Mary knew that Jesus was born to die.  And this lavish, loving, costly gift of hers was in honor of His death and burial.

And I think Jesus wanted Mary to know that He knew that she knew that He was soon to die.

But she had to worship Jesus alone.  In the midst of friends and fellow committed followers, those, like her, who had given their all to Jesus, she still stood alone in her worship.

And sometimes, so will you.

Often the greatest enemies of a faithful follower of Jesus are those who claim to be His faithful followers, but aren’t.  Our churches are sadly filled with lukewarm, half-hearted, tepid, followers of the one and only Son of God.  When confronted with an act of devotion like Mary’s, these Laodicean church members will criticize and denounce the true worshiper only to make their lukewarm efforts seem worthy.  They will viciously tear down others to make themselves feel better.  They live in the gray, the shadows, and are frightened of those, like Mary, who live in the light.

After all, didn’t Jesus say the same?

“And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.  For everyone practicing evil hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his deeds should be exposed.  But he who does the truth comes to the light, that his deeds may be clearly seen, that they have been done in God” (John 3:19-21).

Leaving Laodicea

So understand this, if you truly desire to know Jesus more and more, you will find you’ll make some enemies along the way.  And often, actually, more than not, those enemies will be found nestled in your church and family and among your friends.  Why?  Because they have a vested interest in keeping your spiritual temperature about where theirs is.  Lukewarm.  And if you get too hot for the Lord and make them feel guilty or ashamed or embarrassed, you’ll face, like Mary did, their indignation, rejection and condemnation.

In essence, you must commit yourself to leave Laodicea at all costs and run, full speed, into the non-lukewarm world of fervent worship directed to an audience of only One.  And His name is Jesus.

So if you truly desire to be the kind of worshiper the Lord seeks as His worshiper, you may have to do that alone.  And that’s totally OK.

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Notes:

1097 – to know intimately or by experience, to place favor upon, to choose, a Jewish idiom for sexual intercourse between a man and a woman.
1411 – explosive, dynamic, achieving, miracle working strength, power, or ability.
1492 – to know cognitively, to perceive with the mind, to comprehend, to understand.
2212 – to actively seek after, to look for, to strive to find, to desire earnestly.
2842 – participation in, communion, partnership, the close association between persons, emphasizing what is common between them, being a member of a family.
4352 – to worship, to fall or prostrate before, to kiss as a token or respect or homage.

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Malachi:  Dealing Treacherously with Those We Love

Malachi: Dealing Treacherously with Those We Love

Message from Malachi

A Prophetic Warning to the Church

Dealing Treacherously with Those We Love

“For the Lord God of Israel says that He hates divorce, for it covers one’s garment with violence.”
Malachi 2:16

Beginning in Malachi 2:10, there is a shift from God’s chastisement of the priests to His reproof of the people in general.  Lack of priestly leadership, it seems, is no excuse for unfaithfulness to the Lord.  However, sheep follow the shepherd.  So judgment begins, as the Scripture states, in the house of the Lord, with the shepherds, the priests, and the preachers of today (1 Peter 4:17).  Malachi employs some strong words in this chapter to convey God’s dealings with His people and their attitude towards Him.  He uses treacherously five times in 8 verses.  We also find profane or profaning, abomination, and God saying He literally hates something.  Those two words alone, God and hate, should get our attention.

These are strong words for erring people.


Why Do We Deal Treacherously with Each Other?

The first question God directs to the people in Malachi’s day, and to the church today, is “Why do we deal treacherously (or, unfaithfully, deceitfully, traitorously) with one another?” (Mal. 2:10).  Why do we betray each other?  Why do we deceive, mislead, and victimize each other?  Why do we hold each other, especially within the Body of Christ and in our own marriages, with such contempt, disdain, and disrespect?  Why do we, as brothers and sisters in Christ, as family, heavenly siblings, those chosen by God and created in His own image, profane the Lord by destroying His children, those for whom He died, by our unfaithfulness to each other?  Why would we do that?

Our answer is, of course, we don’t.  We categorically deny any responsibility or knowledge of the offense.  But God sees it differently.  He says all of His people, Judah, Israel, Jerusalem, have “profaned the Lord’s holy institution which He loves.”  And what institution is that? we ask.  Marriage.  And how have we profaned marriage?  We have “married the daughter of a foreign god” (Mal. 2:11).

At this point, most of us would look at the national statistics and our own experience and know we stand guilty regarding our rejection of the sanctity of marriage.  We, the church, divorce each other as fast as those outside the church, sometimes even faster.  It’s now so hard to find someone who is still the “husband of one wife” to serve as our pastor, deacon or elder that we go to great efforts to redefine what “husband of one wife” means so more people in our congregation can qualify (1 Tim. 3:2; Titus 1:6).  And, as the church, we do this to our own shame and peril.


One Man, One Woman, One Lifetime

This passage, primarily, deals with the marriage covenant— one man, one woman, for one lifetime— and how the people and priests in Malachi’s day, and in our own day, have forsaken and profaned it (Mal. 2:11).  Divorce is the greatest betrayal most will ever experience in their lives.  And the children of divorce, those who suffer the most, carry the scars of that betrayal to their graves, often inflicting their pain and hurt on their own children.  Divorce becomes a generational curse, children suffering for the pain of their parents.

Because divorce has become such a part of the fabric of our church life, we’ve become desensitized to it.  After all, every family I know has been impacted by divorce.  Everyone, including my own.  My parents divorced.  My wife’s parents divorced.  My only brother divorced, and on and on it goes.  And since “familiarity breeds contempt” we have turned a blind eye to what God says about divorce.

Malachi is our wake-up call.


Worship, Church-life, and Divorce

The permissive, tolerant, “don’t ask, don’t tell” attitude towards the sin of divorce by the priests in Malachi’s day, and from the pulpits today, is the reason the church is in the shape it’s in regarding marriage.  Pastors today tend to shy away from controversial topics that may incite the congregation and divorce certainly is top of the list.  But truth is to be proclaimed from the pulpit and from the man of God regardless of how uncomfortable that truth may be.  Pastors, priests, and shepherds are to preach “the whole counsel of God” (Acts 20:27) and not simply what the people want to hear (2 Tim. 4:2-3).  Pastors today should view the sanctity of marriage much like Nehemiah did when he rebuked the marital infidelity of the priests and drove the grandson of the high priest from his presence because he had “defiled the priesthood and the covenant of the priesthood and the Levites” (Neh. 13:29).  His crime?  He had divorced his wife to marry another woman, a foreign woman (Mal. 2:11).  Where are the men of God today who will not allow divorce as an option among those he shepherds!

When Malachi speaks of the “daughter of a foreign god” (Mal. 2:11) he is referring to a woman who is not from Israel nor holds to the beliefs and values of the people.  He’s talking about a pagan woman, one the Lord warned would lead His people to worship foreign gods (Ex. 34:11).  It’s a classic case of mixed marriage, being unequally yoked, a believer with a non-believer, which God explicitly forbids (2 Cor. 6:14).  God is speaking about a believer, one under covenant, who divorces his own wife to marry a pagan, a heathen, someone who is not a believer (Mal. 2:10).  And this sin, dealing treacherously with your spouse, had crept into the camp of Israel while the priests, the watchmen and shepherds of God’s people, did nothing to stop it.  In fact, they encouraged divorce and were divorced themselves.  Same can be said of the church and the pastors today.

But why is this so important?

Simply put, as hard as it is to accept, God says He will not receive your worship if you are unfaithful to the “wife of your youth” (Mal. 2:13).  Why?  Because “He hates divorce” (Mal. 2:16).  Cut and dry.  Not open to negotiation or compromise or political correctness.

God says the man who divorces his wife and marries the “daughter of a foreign god” will be “cut off” from Him and His people since he is fully aware, willfully aware, of what he is doing.  Then that very man, while showing such contempt to His covenant, has the arrogance, the audacity, the blatant hypocrisy to come and bring an offering to the Lord and expect God to be pleased (Mal. 2:12).  Not gonna happen.

Malachi 2:13 reads:

And this is the second thing you do: You cover the altar of the Lord with tears, with weeping and crying; So He does not regard the offering anymore, nor receive it with goodwill from your hands.

Regardless of how much emotion you put into your worship of the Lord, even with tears and weeping and crying, God will not hear you nor receive your worship as long as you profane His covenant.  In what way are we profaning His covenant? you ask.  “Because the Lord has been witness between you and the wife of your youth, with whom you have dealt treacherously (or, unfaithfully, deceitfully, traitorously); Yet she is your companion and your wife by covenant” (Mal. 2:14).

In other words, until this sin of treachery and betrayal against our spouse is made right, God and the church can go no further.  They stop at this point.  The pride and belligerence of those who are called by His name (Isa. 43:7), those who defiantly refuse to change their attitudes about something God calls an abomination (Mal. 2:11), must be confessed and repented of.  Must.  Why?  Because God “hates divorce” (Mal. 2:16). He hates divorce because it is the breaking of a covenant between a man and a woman (Mal. 2:14), between two who are now one flesh (Mal. 2:15; Gen. 2:24), and the violation of an oath given before God of our vow, our pledge, and our solemn promise of faithfulness in marriage (Mal. 2:14).  It’s the very definition of dealing treacherously with each other (Mal. 2:10).

There’s no middle ground with God on this issue.  None.  In fact, it might be that the anemic spiritual condition of the church in the West, and of you and me as Believers in Christ, is caused by our willing acceptance of divorce as a viable option in relationships covenanted by God— which is the furthest thing from the truth.  In fact, the Bible gives us only two acceptable reasons for divorce: sexual immorality (Matt. 5:32, 19:19) and the abandonment of a believer by an unbeliever (1 Cor. 7:15).  No where do we find popular phrases like: irreconcilable differences, incapability, or lack of fulfillment, as reasons for divorce.


How Did We End Up Here?

How did we get in this place?

By lowering our standards and accepting the political correctness of this fallen age more than the unchanging truth of Scripture (James 4:4).  By leading our churches via consensus and not by the truth of God’s Word.  In essence, as our congregations begin to experiment with divorce, instead of standing tall and strong for the truth and offend those who are sinning, we change our preaching and morph our Biblical standards just enough to keep those in dire need of repentance coming back.  We want to make church comfortable, even for those in the very throes of sin.  And in doing so, we systematically diminish the holiness of God and the covenant relationship of marriage.  “After all,” we say, “it’s the loving thing to do.  We don’t want to offend anyone.”

Really?  Looks like the only One offended is the Lord.


Courageous

There’s a conversation that takes place in the movie Courageous that sums up the attitude of the church today regarding divorce.  If you’ve seen the movie, you’ll recognize the following.  And if you haven’t seen the movie, you need to watch it today.

David:  I had a good dad, I guess.  I mean the guy wasn’t perfect.  My parents split up when he had an affair.  But I think he regretted it and I struggled with it for a while.  But, you know, divorce just comes with the territory now.

Nathan:  I disagree, man.  Divorce happens because you make it an option.

David:  Nathan, you don’t always know what’s gonna happen.  People change.  You can’t always work stuff out.  Sometimes you need to part ways.

Adam:  I think I agree with Nathan.  People don’t fight for their marriages anymore.

The church needs to step up, to take charge, to boldly lead in the fight to save our marriages.  Why?  Because divorce can no longer be accepted as an easy option for the believer in Christ.  We, as the people of God, desperately need the blessings of God to once again freely flow in our churches, families, and in our nation.  And tolerating what God calls an abomination is not the way to make that happen.


Evil is Not Good in the Sight of the Lord

One final thought.  Are you tired of hearing and reading messages like this one?  Are you weary of preaching that makes you feel bad, uncomfortable, or uneasy?  Would you rather come to church, or read a post, and be blessed and told how good and wonderful you are?

Sure you would.  Most people would.  In fact, that’s what they wanted in Malachi’s day.  But God had another idea.

Malachi 2:17 reads:

Statement:  You have wearied the Lord with your words;

Question:  Yet you say, “In what way have we wearied Him?”

Answer:  In that you say, “Everyone who does evil is good in the sight of the Lord, and He delights in them,” or, “Where is the God of justice?”

Just so you’ll know, the Lord doesn’t delight in those who sin and do evil.  In fact, His Word says just the opposite, “God is a just God, and God is angry with the wicked every day” (Psalm 7:11).

Just.

Angry.

But, forgiving.

Repent of the sin that separates you from His blessing and enjoy the freedom only He can give.

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Malachi:  Excrement and the Clergy

Malachi: Excrement and the Clergy

Message from Malachi

A Prophetic Warning to the Church

Excrement and the Clergy

“Behold, I will rebuke your descendants and spread refuse on your faces,
The refuse of your solemn feasts; and one will take you away with it.”
Malachi 2:3

In the second chapter of Malachi we find one of the most chilling and sobering warnings to the priests of Malachi’s day, and to the preachers of our day, found anywhere in Scripture.  Malachi gives us just a glimpse of how our Lord views His priests and preachers and pastors— literally anyone who claims to speak for Him, who fail to give glory to His name (Mal. 2:2).  And the actions of God against the clergy are disturbing, if not outright frightening.


No Honor to My Name

In Malachi 1:6, God begins to chastise the priests because of their disdain and hypocrisy for Him.  They bend over backwards to offer praise and homage and respect to everyone on earth but Him.  He says, “A son honors his father, and a servant his master.  If then I am the Father, where is My honor?  And if I am a Master, where is My reverence?” says the Lord of hosts to you priests who despise My name.”

Later on in the chapter God again chastises the priests for offering polluted, defiled, worthless sacrifices to Him and trying to pass it off as true worship (Mal. 1:8).  By the time we get to Malachi 1:10, God is telling the priests to “Shut the door of the temple and go home.  You’re wasting your time and My time.  No worship is taking place and I have no pleasure in you.”  Why?  Because they profane His name (Mal. 1:12), seem bored with the task of worship (Mal. 1:13), and greedily keep the best for themselves and give the scraps to God (Mal. 1:14).


The Rebuke of the Clergy

This is where it gets scary.

Remember Who is speaking: God Almighty, the great “I AM”, the Sovereign One, the Creator and Sustainer of everything, the Great and Final Judge.  And remember who He is speaking to: the priests, the preachers and clergy, those who have been called and chosen by God to give Him honor, respect, obedience, love and awe.  Before you sit back and smugly think this warning doesn’t apply to you since you are not a preacher, remember Revelation 1:6 where Christ has made each of us “kings and priests to His God and Father.”  In other words, you and I are also priests of God and, like all priests, should spend our lives glorifying God— whether we have a seminary degree or not.  This warning is for each of us today.

“And now, O priests, this commandment is for you” (Mal. 2:1).

What commandment?  Does the word “this” refer to the commandments from chapter one or do they look forward to the commands of chapter two and following?  Answer: both.  And what happens when the priests fail to heed God’s warning, fail to repent, and give Him the glory due His name?  What happens when preachers, pastors, evangelists, and teachers in the church become selfish, greedy, self-centered and self-seeking, narcissistic, nothing more than egotistical glory-seekers for themselves and begin to lead His sheep astray?  What is God to do then?

“If you will not hear (or, listen, obey), and if you will not take it to heart (or, commit, consider), to give (what) glory to (what) My name,” says the Lord of hosts, “I will send a curse upon you, and I will curse your blessings.  Yes, I have cursed them already, because you do not take it to heart” (Mal. 2:2).

What is God commanding His priests, you and I, to do?  Give glory to His Name.  The term glory means the weight or gravity of God’s presence.  It defines His importance and the honor He is due as God.  The word name is mentioned 6 times in the first 16 verses of Malachi and is the summation of all the attributes of God: His character, reputation, everything.  God is saying if they, we, do not give Him the glory due is name, He will send a curse upon us and our blessings.  In fact, He says, that curse has already begun.

So how bad will the curse be?  How serious is God about all of this?  Is He more serious than He was in Revelation 3:16 where He “vomited them (the church) out of His mouth” for being apathetic, lethargic, and lukewarm?

“Behold, I will rebuke your descendants (or, offspring, children) and spread refuse (or, dung, fecal matter, excrement) on your faces, the refuse of your solemn feasts; and one will take you away with it” (Mal. 2:3).

Really?  God can’t be serious.  Does God really mean He will spread, or smear refuse, or dung, fecal matter, excrement, on the faces of His priests and their descendants.  I can’t believe God would do this?  It seems so harsh, so hard.  I didn’t think not giving glory to His name was that big of deal.

Well, it is.  You’d better think again.

One of the natural byproducts of animal sacrifices, in addition to a torrent of blood, is excessive excrement or refuse or dung.  Just like what happens when a frightened dog is put in a cage and taken to the Vet, the same thing happens to the cows, sheep, goats and other animals awaiting their death.  The place where the animals were sacrificed reeked with excrement.  According to Levitical law, the excrement, along with other parts of the sacrifice, was to be removed, carried outside the camp, and burned (Ex. 29:14; Lev. 16:27).  They were considered disgusting, defiled, and had no place around the holiness of God.  Of great offense to the priests would be to get fecal matter or dung on their clothing, sandals, or on their skin.  God is saying to the priests He would take this same fecal matter, this animal excrement, and smear it into the creases of their faces.  Why?  Because refusing to show glory and honor to the Lord is not something He takes lightly.  And then the priests are removed, outside of the camp, with the excrement, to be disposed of.  This is what God thinks of those who hypocritically proclaim His name.

After God chastises His priests as such, He then says, “Then you shall know that I have sent this commandment to you” (Mal. 2:4).  Then you’ll know how truly disgusted I am with you.  Then you’ll know exactly how I feel about your hypocrisy and apathy and contempt for Me.  Yes, then you’ll know how you smell to Me, not as a pleasing aroma, but as excrement.  The animal refuse from your “solemn feasts” (Mal. 2:3).


How Should the Priests Repent?

“My covenant was with him, one of life and peace, and I gave them to him that he might fear Me; so he feared Me and was reverent before My name. The law of truth was in his mouth, and injustice was not found on his lips. He walked with Me in peace and equity, and turned many away from iniquity” (Mal. 2:5-6).

God then uses Levi and as example of how He expects His priests to live and function and fulfill their duty as examples of holiness, righteousness, and sanctity before the God and the people.  What God said to the priests in Malachi’s day, He also says to us today:  We would be wise to listen and obey (Mal. 2:1).

One. the priests must live in contentment with God (Phil. 4:11-13), satisfied with the “life and peace” given them (Mal. 2:5).

Two, they must learn to live in the fear of the Lord, learning how to honor and revere Him above all else (Mal. 2:5).  They must show profound respect for God, His glory, and His name.

Three, they must live and preach the truth.  They must stand for God’s Word, His righteousness, justice, and equity (Mal. 2:6).

Four, they must spend their lives for the sake of others, as a watchman on the wall (Eze. 3:17), turning many away from iniquity by word and deed (Mal. 2:6).

Five, the priests must “walk with God” (Mal. 2:6).  Not walk after God, but walk with God, like Elijah, like David, like Daniel, like Enoch.  They must have the mind of Christ (1 Cor. 2:16), be filled with the Holy Spirit (Eph. 5:18), and care about nothing but Jesus Christ and Him crucified (1 Cor. 2:2).

Finally, the priests then and the preachers today must seek and speak the knowledge and truth of God.  Why?  For he, you and I, are a messenger of the Lord of Hosts.

“For the lips of a priest should keep knowledge, and people should seek the law from his mouth; for he is the messenger of the Lord of hosts” (Mal. 2:7).

We, as preachers, as priests, as believers in Christ, as heirs, as joint heirs with the Lord (Rom. 8:17) must seek with every breath in our being the glory of God and the honor of His name.

For if we fail, it may take more than just a few handy wipes or a swipe of antibacterial lotion to wipe the excrement of our sin off our faces.

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Can We Trust Jesus at His Word?

Can We Trust Jesus at His Word?

As I’ve studied John 7, I’ve become somewhat fixated at verse 46.  This verse has spoken truth to me and has forced me to face some blind spots, some shortcomings, some failures in my relationship with my Lord Jesus.  And these failures come in the form of childlike trust.  Or my lack of childlike trust in my Lord.

Let me set the scene for you.

As Jesus was preaching His Word to the unbelieving crowd gathered in Jerusalem for the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:2), the Pharisees and chief priests were conspiring together to have Jesus arrested and removed from their midst.  They did not want the Romans involved, at least not yet, so they ordered the Temple officers, or Temple police, to “take Him” when the opportunity presented itself and bring Him back to them for trial (John 7:32).

It appears the officers shadowed Jesus for a least one full day, maybe more, before returning to the Pharisees empty handed.  In John 7:32, they are given the command to “take Him” and at least one other day passes by the time we get to John 7:37 when Jesus stands up on the last day, the great day of the feast, and offers His “thirst, come, and drink” invitation.  They listened to Jesus for at least one full day.  They also heard the promise of the Holy Spirit swelling to rivers of living water to those who believed (John 7:38-39).  And something in the words of Jesus changed them.

The crowd who heard Jesus’ message was divided (John 7:43) as to what to think about the man.  Some said He was the Prophet and others the Christ.  Still others couldn’t make up their mind and argued about Old Testament prophecies concerning the Messiah and how many, if any, Jesus fulfilled (John 7:40-42).

But the officers weren’t divided.  They listened and they knew and they returned to the Pharisees without Jesus, without excuses, empty handed.  When the Pharisees demanded, “Why have you not brought Him?” (John 7:45).  They simply replied, with bewildered expressions on their faces, “No man ever spoke like this Man!” (John 7:46).  Yes, no man had the words of truth like Jesus and no man ever said the things Jesus said.

No one.  Ever.


They Believed Jesus at His Word.  Do We?

I wish I could trust the words of Jesus more than I do.  I wish I had the faith to believe everything He said, even the hard stuff.  For example, in Matthew 6:33 Jesus promised, “Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.”  And what things was Jesus talking about?  For starters, the very things I worry and fret over: my life (Matt. 6:25), how will I provide for my family (Matt. 6:31), and what the uncertain future holds (Matt. 6:34).  But Jesus clearly said if I seek His Kingdom and His righteousness first, before anything else, then He will take care of my needs.  As a good and gracious Lord, He will provide food, shelter and clothing for me.  And not only that, but He said He knows me so well that the very hairs on my head are numbered (Matt. 10:30).  Not counted, numbered.  He know and loves us that much!

But that’s a hard thing to believe.  And I don’t know why.

Jesus says if I, being evil, know how to give good gifts to my children, how much more will my Heavenly Father give good gifts to me? (Matt. 7:11).  Why is this truth so hard to live by?  Why is it so hard to believe?

These officers were listening to Jesus speak while they were strategizing for the best time, the most opportune moment, to arrest Him and bring Him back bound to the Pharisees.  But His words changed their heart.  His words changed their view of life, their view of true, eternal authority, and their view of their purpose, meaning, and destiny.  They were no longer pacified with the temporal, passing, transitory trinkets of life— now they were enamored with the Kingdom of God, and the King Eternal.


What Did They Hear Jesus Say?

One, they head Jesus proclaim, over and over again, He was sent from God (John 7:28-29).  Not sent by God, but sent from God.  This implies a pre-existence with the One who sent Him.  You and I can be send by God.  But Jesus was sent from God.  And there is a great difference between the two.

Two, they heard Jesus say His life was not His own, but was planned, ordered and arranged by God (John 7:6).  Jesus said everything is in His Father’s hand and He was here to do His Father’s will.  In fact, the very words these guards heard Jesus speak came from the Father, and not from Jesus (John 7:16-17).  Jesus spoke and modeled true submission to authority.

Three, they heard Jesus say that He, and He alone, was the answer to man’s deepest needs.  He invited the guards to come to Him and drink and let Him satisfy their thirst for peace, joy, and purpose in this life (John 7:37-38).  Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.  No one comes to the Father except through Me” (John 14:6).

Four, they heard Jesus say He comes to offer them the greatest blessing imaginable (John 7:38).  He promised the gift of the Holy Spirit, the Third Person of the Trinity, to live inside of each of them, to take up residence as our deposit, our guarantee of our future inheritance to come in Him (Eph. 1:14).

And the officers were so mesmerized by the words of Christ, so thankful for what they heard, they went back to the Pharisees empty handed, willing to suffer whatever consequences awaited them.  But they didn’t care.  Because they had been in the presence of the Living Lord Jesus and had learned to trust Him at His word.

I pray that you and I, the church, would learn to do the same.  To simply trust Him at His word.

After all, “No man ever spoke like this Man!” (John 7:46).

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Salvation:  The Deception of Non-Saving Faith

Salvation: The Deception of Non-Saving Faith

All throughout Scripture we see examples of people who have faith, but it’s non-saving faith.  After all, everyone of us have some type of faith and we exercise faith every day.  We have faith a car will stop while we cross the street, we have faith our prescriptions will actually do what our doctor told us they would do, we have faith a chair will hold us up when we sit down in a crowded restaurant, and we have faith the sun will come up in the morning as we prepare to go to the job we have faith we still have.  We all have faith— but we have faith at different levels and in different things.  And not all faith is the same.

For example, we have a certain type of faith in our government or in our economic system or in the media.  But that faith is not as strong, nor of the same substance, as the faith we have in the sanctity of our marriage, or in the trustworthiness of our best friend, or in our ability to keep a promise to those we love.  Each of these kinds of faith are as different and varied as the objects of that faith.  And none of these reaches the level of faith or trust or dependence we would expect to have in Christ.  Hence, we would call these examples, non-saving faith.

But what happens when a seeking person, just like you or me, comes to Jesus for salvation with nothing more than non-saving faith?  Would that person be saved?  Or would they be deceived into thinking what faith they had, bordering on intellectual curiosity, was sufficient for salvation?


The Deception of Non-Saving Faith

The Scriptures repeatedly warn about the deception of non-saving faith.  In the Parable of the Sower, seventy-five percent of the seeds sown did not lead to salvation (Matt. 13:3-9).  Those who sowed in the shallow soil and in the thorny soil were deceived into thinking mere growth, without corresponding fruit, equates to salvation.  Or, to put it another way, faith, without corresponding fruit, leads to salvation.  And the Scriptures clearly state they don’t.

Additionally, the Scriptures talk about having a “form of godliness but denying its power.  And from such people turn away!” (2 Tim. 3:5).  We see people like Hymenaeus and Alexander, both lost, serving as prominent members of the church (1 Tim. 1:20).  There are those who come to the wedding feast dressed in clothes of their own righteousness.  The end result?  They were bound, hand and foot, and “cast into outer darkness; there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Matt. 22:13).  We have the warning from the Lord about the wide road that leads to destruction and the narrow gate that leads to life (Matt. 7:13-14).  And, in the book of Hebrews, there are those who were “once enlightened and have tasted the heavenly gift” but never fully drank of the living waters of salvation (Heb. 6:4).

Remember, Jesus said He “did not come to bring peace on the earth, but a sword” (Matt. 10:34) and “a man’s enemies will be those of his own household” (Matt. 10:36).  How?  Because our commitment to Christ must be greater than our love and devotion for those we hold most dear, even our own family.  Jesus, when asked “Who is My mother and who are My brothers?” said of His own family, “For whoever does the will of My Father in heaven is My brother and sister and mother” (Matt. 12:48-50).

The sad truth is many people come to Christ but never fully partake, or drink, of Him (John 7:37) and are deceived into believing they are truly saved.  Many people, most in fact, go part of the way towards Christ and end up short of true salvation.  They feel and recognize their need for Christ and acknowledge He is the only One that can satisfy their deepest longings, yet they fail to appropriate Him into their lives on His terms.  They thirst, they come— but they fail to drink.  They create their own gospel, their own way of salvation, and their own standards of righteousness, holiness and sanctification.  Yet they are deceived— because a man-made Gospel does not lead to Christ.


Thirst, Come and Drink

On the last day of the Feast of Tabernacles, approximately six months before Jesus was to celebrate His last Passover in Jerusalem and was later betrayed and crucified (John 13:1), He stood in the midst of the crowd and gave the following invitation: “If anyone thirsts, let him come to Me and drink.  He who believes in Me, as the Scripture has said, out of his heart will flow rivers of living water” (John 7:37-38).  Jesus gives His gospel presentation to a group of people who have very different views about who He is.  And whenever Jesus presents us with Himself— He always forces us to chose.  We are forced to either accept Him on His terms or to reject Him outright.  There’s no middle ground, no gray area, and it’s not open to personal interpretation.  It happened to the crowd at the Feast of Tabernacles and it happens today every time the Gospel of Christ is proclaimed.

The questions are always the same:  Who is Jesus?  What is truth? (John 18:38).  Is Jesus who He really says He is?  And, if He is, what does that mean for me?  Is it really possible to have my sins forgiven?  How can I be reconciled with God?  Tell me, what must I do to be saved? (Acts 2:37).

In this passage, three key words describe the path of true salvation.  The words are thirst, come, and drink.  And the promise, of course, to those who thirst, come, and drink: eternal life with God and the filling of the Holy Spirit, the living water Jesus talked about (John 7:39).

Thirst – those who thirst recognize a deep longing, an intense craving, an unsatisfied need in their life.  It’s those who come to grips with the reality that their life has no eternal purpose or meaning and they are “dead in their trespasses and sins” (Eph. 2:1).  They instinctively perceive there’s more to life than what they’re experiencing and, therefore, they try to fill the void they feel with all sorts of carnal sensations— sex, drugs, food, false religions and philosophies, immoral relationships, pride, selfishness, arrogance— until they finally admit only Jesus can bring light into their darkness.

Come – when the personal longings become unbearable and the promise of redemption seems so alluring, so captivating, and enticing, many come to Jesus for what He promises to offer.  These understand who Jesus claims to be, the exalted Son of God, the Messiah, the Christ, the Lord, and they understand what He has done for them, redeeming them from the penalty and power of sin by dying for them on the cross.  What they know and understand about Jesus is true.  The problem, however, is what they do with that truth.

In other words, there’s more to salvation than simply coming to Jesus.  You can’t just come and receive Him on your terms as some sort of trade or barter transaction.  You must enter through the narrow gate (Matt. 7:13), on His terms, and His terms are not open to negotiation.  His terms are all or nothing, total commitment, His life for yours.  He doesn’t come to make us better or to enhance certain aspects of our life… no, He comes to put us to death and raise us to life again in His image, as His child, to do His will and not our own (Rom. 6:3; 1 Peter 3:18). He is the Lord, the Sovereign One, God Almighty (Phil. 2:10-11), and we are now voluntary slaves, bondslaves, of His.  Remember the words from Romans 10:9: “That if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.”  Note, it’s Jesus as Lord and nothing else.  You cannot come to Jesus as Savior only.  He is Savior, because He is Lord.

Most people never make it this far.  They never move past simply coming to Jesus and they never progress to true salvation.  Most view Jesus as an enlightened master or great teacher or the supreme moral example for all mankind, but never as Lord.  They fail to take Him at His Word, or count the costs of salvation (Matt. 8:19-22), and to give their lives to Him in abject submission and humility.  They want what He can do for them to make their life better, but they do not want Him as their Lord.  So they say a prayer and try to incorporate some behavior, moral changes into their life and maybe even experience a deceptive sense of salvation, like a sensation of peace or contentment, but they have never yielded or surrendered their life to Him nor submitted to His Lordship.  And, as sad as it may seem, they’re still lost.  Why?  Because their nature has not been changed (2 Cor. 5:17), redemption and conversion have not taken place, and the Holy Spirit does not indwell them as their deposit, their guarantee of their future inheritance in Christ (Eph. 1:14).  And then Jesus will declare to them, “I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!” (Matt. 7:23).

Drink – this is where true salvation takes place.  You have a thirst and you come to Christ to quench and satisfy your thirst, yet simply coming to where the Living Water flows does not, in itself, quench your thirst.  You must drink.  You must partake.  You must be engulfed, enveloped, saturated in Christ, the Living Water.  He must be everything to you if you are to receive anything from Him.  Salvation, being a joint-heir with Christ (Rom. 8:17), requires more than reciting some prayer as a nine year old at VBS.  It’s a radical, unconditional, total and complete, without reservation and with reckless abandonment, pledge, vow, promise, commitment, allegiance to Christ as Lord.  You are no longer your own to do what you wish with your life (1 Cor. 6:19).  You have been bought with a price, you now belong to Him, and you are to live to bring Him honor (1 Cor. 6:20).  You are now pilgrims and strangers on the earth (Heb. 11:13; 1 Pet. 2:11), because this world is not your home (Heb. 13:14).

This is this kind of all or nothing relationship that marked the disciples, the early church, and every true believer since Pentecost until today.  And, if you truly know Christ and are known by Him, it will mark your life also.


Those Who Believed Jesus… Kinda

The Scriptures tell us when Jesus finished His invitation to the unbelieving crowd to come and drink of Him and those who would come and drink would receive, in themselves, the flowing rivers of eternal life in the person of the Holy Spirit (John 7:37-39), the crowd was divided.  Some believed His words, but only partially.  Some didn’t believe at all, and wanted to destroy Him (John 7:44).

Nothing much has changed.  As it was back then, so it is today.


Truly this is the Prophet

John 7:40-41 states:  Therefore many from the crowd, when they heard this saying, said, “Truly this is the Prophet.”  Others said, “This is the Christ.”  Note, they said He was the Prophet, capitalized, and not a prophet.  This first group was asserting that Jesus was the fulfillment of Deuteronomy 18:15 where Moses said, “The Lord your God will raise up for you a Prophet like me from your midst, from your brethren. Him you shall hear,”  For centuries this passage had be interpreted to prophetically speak of the coming Messiah, the Christ.  However, by the time of Jesus, the Jewish scholars, from their understanding of Malachi 3, believed the passage spoke more of the forerunner of the Messiah (Mal. 4:5-6). and not the Messiah Himself.  Now the Prophet was someone who would show men their need for a Redeemer, for Christ, and then faithfully point them to the only One who could satisfy their need.  But the Prophet was not the Messiah and could not, himself, satisfy their thirst, need or longing.  He could just point the way or be a path or channel, but He had no power or authority to grant salvation.

Unfortunately, many people still believe this about Jesus.

They believed Jesus came to point men towards the truth, but they would fervently deny He was the Truth (John 14:6).  They would declare Jesus came to point men to someone or something coming to satisfy all their needs, but He was not that Someone and He did not possess the something they were looking for.  The men who said, “Truly this is the Prophet” (John 7:40), recognized and affirmed the special status Jesus had as a one-of-a-kind religious leader who did things and taught things unlike any religious figure before (John 7:46).  He was in a class all by Himself.  They would even go so far as to say Jesus was sent by God and had a special relationship with God (John 3:2).  But they would not receive Him as God or serve Him as Lord.  They wanted Jesus and something else, anything else.  These were those who thirsted and came, but never drank.


This is the Christ

The second group said, “This is the Christ” (John 7:41).  This group recognized and believed Jesus was the Messiah, the Christ, the Savior of Israel, the One prophesied from the Old Testament (Luke 2:11).  Yes, they knew these facts about Him to be true, but they defiantly refused, like the first group, to bend their knee to Him as Lord (Rom. 14:11; Phil. 2:10).  They refused to commit their lives and future to Him as the Sovereign One.  The Scriptures do not indicate this group followed Jesus as Lord.  They simply said, “Yes, I believe He is the Son of God and, yes, I believe He is the Messiah and the Christ.  So what?  What does that mean to me?  Now, pass me the butter and biscuits.  I’m hungry.”

This group confessed Jesus as something, but not as Lord (Rom. 10:9).  They had non-saving faith in Jesus as the Christ.


This is the Christ… uh, but…

Then there’s the group that fully confessed Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the Living God (Matt. 16:16), but would rather argue and bicker and debate over trivial matters of their own theology and reject Jesus because, in their mind, He didn’t meet every jot or tittle they thought He should (Matt. 5:18).  These are the ones who argue saying, “He can’t be the Christ because He came from Galilee and the Christ is supposed to come from Bethlehem.  Plus, the Scriptures teach the Messiah must come from the line of David, and I’m not sure where this guy comes from” (John 7:40-42).  So they compared what little they knew about Jesus with their own limited and incomplete knowledge of the prophetic Scriptures and concluded He could not possibly be the Messiah because He failed to meet all their sincerely held convictions of what the Messiah would be.  We have many in the church today who operate the same way.  They smugly elevate their own statement of beliefs or denominational creeds or preferences to the level of infallible Scripture and use them as a litmus test for fellowship or, sadly, salvation, and even truth.

But if this group would’ve investigated further, they would’ve discovered Jesus was from the line of David (Matt. 22:42) and did come from Bethlehem (Micah 5:2) and fulfilled all of the Old Testament prophecies regarding the Messiah (John 5:39).  But they were more concerned with being right in the eyes of each other and promoting their own theological brand or position than in knowing the truth.  In their apathy and laziness, they failed to look for the truth because they arrogantly assumed they’d already found it.  And in their pride and hypocrisy they missed their Messiah.

Again, just like the first two groups, they also missed out on eternal life.


Those Who Did Not Believe Jesus

The final group were those who hated the Lord Jesus and wanted to destroy Him.  These were the ones who wanted to take Him by force (John 7:44) but were prevented because, from God’s perspective, it was not yet His time and His hour had not come (John 7:30).  Needless to say, the people in this group did not understand Christ nor receive the gift of salvation He offered (John 7:37-39).


To What Group Do You Belong?

So where do you fit in?  What is your response to Christ?  Do you believe partially, somewhat, kinda, in Him?  Do you say, “Yes, He was a good man, and yes, He was sent from God, and yes, He’s a great moral teacher and example, and, yes, He’s a path or a way of some sorts to God.”  If so, that’s not enough.  Your confession of Him or your profession of faith is severely lacking.  Fatally lacking.  For Jesus, He is all or nothing.  There is no partial with Him.  There’s no half way, no honorable mention, no consolation prize, and no kudos for trying.  He’s all or nothing, totally in or totally out, through the narrow gate only, and on His terms without negotiation or compromise.

Remember His words,

“Most assuredly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you.  Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.  For My flesh is food indeed, and My blood is drink indeed” (John 6:53-55).

Or, in other words, Jesus gives eternal life to those who ingest Him into the core of their very being, as their strength, source of daily nourishment, their very sustenance.  Jesus did not come to make us better, or to enhance or improve our fallen lives.  No, He came to make us new, to put the old man to death and to raise the new man to life with Him.  And what kind of life does He promise?  It’s beyond anything we can ask or think (Eph. 3:20-21).  He offers a peace that surpasses all understanding (Phil. 4:7).  And He promises we will be children of God, and if children, then heirs, and if heirs, then joint heirs with Christ (Rom. 8:17).  Just think, all that Christ is and all He possesses becomes ours as a joint heir with Him— when, and here is the requirement, we give all that we are to Him.  This promise belongs to those who exercise real, genuine, saving faith in the completed work of Christ.

One final thought, the seeds that fell on the path, in a shallow soil, and in the soil infested with weeds and thorns, did not produce fruit (Matt. 13:3-9).  They did not lead to eternal life.  Why?  Because Jesus never said you’ll know My disciples by their profession, nor church membership, nor civic good works, nor non-profit activities, nor from the applause of men — you will know them by their fruits (Matt. 7:16-20).

Fruits.  And nothing else.

Do your fruits indicate you belong to Him?

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Salvation:  What About the Sinner’s Prayer?

Salvation: What About the Sinner’s Prayer?

Since we have established the fact that salvation is a spiritual experience and can also involve the emotions or feelings, the question to be asked is what happens when the salvation experience is devoid of any change in emotion or how someone feels?  What happens when the person never feels anything, no change, nothing new, after they pray the “sinner’s prayer” and ask Jesus into their heart?  What does that mean?

I know, just the mention of the “sinner’s prayer” gives one pause, doesn’t it.

What is the sinner’s prayer and what does it mean?  What is a proper “sinner’s prayer”?  What specific words have to be spoken in order for true salvation to take place?  How much of the actual prayer does the sinner need to quote properly in order to get saved?  What’s a passing grade?  And how much of the prayer do you really have to believe to make it into heaven?  After all, we don’t want to miss the cut by just a few points.

See the confusion?  Let’s take a look at the “sinner’s prayer” together.


The Sinner’s Prayer:  What it is

In the church today, evangelism is often focused on simply getting someone to say a prayer or a formula that we believe always leads to salvation.  Why?  Because we have reduced the glorious gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ to a short creedal statement of mere facts about Jesus, or redefined it as a set of steps or laws, much like a cake recipe, one must follow.  If we can get the person to pray the formula or recite the facts, or just agree with us while we mouth the magic words, then our theology states salvation has taken place.  Why?  Because, we reason, they have “confessed with their mouth the Lord Jesus”— and we assume “have believed in their heart that God raised Him from the dead”— hence, we conclude they “will be saved” (Rom 10:9).  And, to be fair, a casual look at this Scripture could give you that impression.

This prayer, popularly known as the sinner’s prayer, can vary widely in how it’s administered or recited, but always includes some required key elements in order to make it valid.  It’s a prayer that fulfills the confession requirement in Romans 10:9.  And we just assume that to confess means to pray and believe what we feel are key components about Christ and His nature and His atonement. It becomes a sort of short mini-catechism or dwarfed creedal statement.

One of the key requirements in the sinner’s prayer are some words that indicate the person understands they are, in fact, a sinner and in need of salvation.  This is obvious.  In this part of the prayer they would acknowledge their sin and guilt before the Lord and confess they have fallen short of what God’s intention was for them (Rom. 3:10, 23).  There would also be an understanding of their eternal state apart from Christ and His forgiveness and a distinction between heaven, the desired place, and Hell, the default place (Rom. 6:23).

Another required component in the sinner’s prayer would be the understanding of what God has provided for them through His Son Jesus Christ in order to have their sins forgiven and forgotten.  The prayer would include some words that acknowledge the fact that their sins were imputed to Christ and His righteousness was imputed to them and they are trusting in His completed work for the atonement for their sins.

The sinner’s prayer might go something like this:  “Lord, I know that I am a sinner and that I have lived my life for myself and not for You.  I confess my sins before You and ask that You forgive my sins because I believe that Jesus paid the penalty for my sins for me when He died on the cross.  I believe that Jesus is the Son of God and that He was raised from the dead on the third day and I’m asking You to come into my life to be my Lord and Saviour.  I renounce my life of sin and self and accept the healing and cleansing that only You can give.  Thank You for hearing my prayer and forgiving my sins.  For the rest of my life I want to love and serve only You.  Amen.”

Then, as far as we know, we assume the person praying the prayer was sincere and, therefore, is now saved.  But the Scriptures tell us the evidence of salvation is not a verbal prayer, no matter how sincere that prayer may be, but fruits that only the Holy Spirit can bring (Matt. 7:17-20).  But as not to get sidetracked, we’ll look into the evidence of true salvation at a later time.


The Sinner’s Prayer:  What it isn’t

The sinner’s prayer is not an incantation or mantra that always leads to salvation.  More often than not, it leads to a false sense of security for the unbeliever and literally innoculates them from true salvation.  It can function as the billboard to the wide road that leads to destruction Jesus warned us about (Matt. 7:13).  Let me explain.

For the past century or two we have been taught, both in seminary and from the pulpit, if a person says the sinner’s prayer they are saved.  And, under that assumption, we quickly baptize them to somehow “seal the deal” without any observable evidence of their salvation— no changed nature, no redeemed affections, no spiritual fruit, nothing.  We simply accept them at their word and on the authority of the prayer just prayed and forge ahead as if everything was fine.

But when warning sirens go off and they say something’s wrong, they don’t think they’re saved, or they begin to doubt the magic prayer worked, we ignore their pleas and chalk it up to Satan “just trying to make you doubt what God has already done in your heart.”  We point to Romans 10:13— “Whoever calls on the name of the Lord will be saved”— and say, “Did you call on the name of the Lord?  Are you a whoever?  If you did, according to this verse, you’re saved!  So just believe it and don’t worry about how you feel.  The feelings will come later.”

Really?  So it’s more like the Amway slogan of “just fake it until you make it.”  No, I believe salvation, as we’ve stated before, radically changes every aspect of your life, and so much so, that you would know experientially if you had truly died and been raised to a new life in Christ (Rom. 6:4).

Reciting or memorizing historical facts about Christ does not, of itself, lead one to salvation.  For example, at the end of a Sunday service a young man walks down the aisle and tells the preacher he wants to get saved.  The preacher would, most likely, say something like this:

“Young man, do you believe Jesus is the Son of God?”
“Yes.”
“Do you believe He died on the cross, was raised on the third day, ascended into heaven, is seated at the right hand of the Father, and is coming again in glory?”
“Yes, I do.”
“Are you asking Him to forgive you of all your sins and inviting Him to be the Lord of your life?”
“Yes sir, I am.”
“Great.  Then repeat this simple sinner’s prayer with me and you’ll be saved.”

But Satan could also recite these same historical facts about Jesus.  He could even pray most of the sinner’s prayer and still not receive the gift of salvation.  How can that be if the sinner’s prayer saves?

“Satan, do you believe Jesus is the Son of God?”
“Absolutely!  I know it to be a fact.”
“Satan, do you believe He died on the cross, was raised on the third day, ascended into heaven, is seated at the right hand of the Father, and is coming again in glory?”
“Yes, I know what He did on the cross and all about His resurrection.  And I also know, and dread the day, when He will come back in glory.  I know all these things to be true.”
“Satan, are you asking Him to forgive you of all your sins and inviting Him to be the Lord of your life?”
“No.  I will not bow my knee to the Lordship of anyone but me.”

As you can see, salvation is much more than a simple prayer, it’s an acknowledgment, a life-long commitment, a fervent trust, a submission, originating from the very core of our being, that Jesus is Lord.  We focus on the confession part of Romans 10:9 because it’s easy, and not the object of that confession, the Lordship of Christ, because it’s so hard.  Simple, yes.  But very hard.  For it’s only belief, or faith, in the object of that confession, Jesus is Lord, that brings about salvation and not the simple confession itself.

That if you confess with your mouth (the confession) the Lord Jesus (the object of the confession) and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved (Romans 10:9).

To restate, there’s more to salvation than just mouthing the sinner’s prayer.  And we would all like to think by repeating the sinner’s prayer the seeking person is actually declaring to God their total reliance on Christ as their Lord and Saviour and trusting in His completed work on the cross as all sufficient.  And we also understand there are no magical words needed to be said in order for salvation to take place.  Why?  Because salvation is by faith through grace in Christ alone, plus nothing and minus nothing (Eph. 2:8).  But there’s more.


The Sinner’s Prayer:  The Caboose of Salvation

The reality is that a believer is actually saved before they even utter the first words of the sinner’s prayer.  Are you shocked?  You shouldn’t be.  It’s not the prayer that makes a sinner a Christian, it’s the prayer of a sinner, already now a Christian, giving God glory by testifying what He has already done in their life.  And what has the Lord already done?  Election, the effectual calling of the sinner to Himself, conversion, regeneration, and much more.  Sound confusing?

Regeneration and conversion have already taken place by the time the sinner places His faith in Christ and, based on that faith, utters the words of the sinner’s prayer.  Plus, the very faith placed in Christ is faith given by God for that very purpose.  Why?  Because Scripture states, “there is none righteous, no, not one; there is none who understands; there is none who seeks after God” (Rom. 3:10-11).  So the only way someone seeks for God is if God places that desire for Him in them.  And the only way we can place faith in Christ, faith we don’t have in and of ourselves, is if God gives us the faith to place in His Son.  Because on our own, as Romans 3:10-11 teach, we would not seek God and would not have saving faith to place in the work of Christ.  It’s all a gift from Him, a sovereign act of grace.

From start to finish, from election to glorification, salvation is all God.  And since this is true, then we’re saved before we even utter the first words of the sinner’s prayer.

Are you confused?  Does it seem strange to you?

We’ll look into this topic in greater detail, next.

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