Hypocrisy and the Preacher

Hypocrisy and the Preacher

Guilty as charged.

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No minister is worthy of his calling.  Every preacher is vulnerable to the charge of hypocrisy.  In fact, the more faithful a preacher is to the Word of God in his preaching, the more liable he is to the charge of hypocrisy.  Why?  Because the more faithful a man is to the Word of God, the higher the message is that he will preach.  The higher the message, the further he will be from obeying it himself.

From The Holiness of God by RC Sproul.

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Doing Great Things for God

Doing Great Things for God

The following is from RC Sproul, Jr.  It is a wonderful reminder that sometimes God, in His sovereignty, has plans for us that we didn’t ask for nor desire.  But they are His plans, nonetheless.  Also, as a bit of background, RC’s wife has been suffering with a debilitating illness for quite some time.

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Doing Great Things

We first learned that my little girl Shannon would always be a little girl, when we discovered about her first birthday that she was profoundly disabled. My father, a deeply compassionate man, asked how I was handling the news. I told him that I had been preparing for this moment all my life. If anyone should be able to rest in the sovereignty of God it is me. The sovereignty of God is the cornerstone of Reformed theology, which theology I have been schooled in from my youth by one of its greatest living proponents.

greatthingsThe sovereignty of God, rightly understood, was the very core of my father’s best known work, The Holiness of God. The doctrine came front and center in his next book, Chosen by God. I was a young man when those books were first published. Like many others I ate them up, drank them in, and like too many young men, spat out their wisdom with precious little grace and care. I reveled in God’s sovereignty, and delighted in nothing more than to argue for, to defend, to proclaim that sovereignty.

That all changed, however, when I read still another book by my father, this one born of a family hardship. Surprised by Suffering begins with the still-born birth of my niece, Alissa. From there the book explores not just the truth that God ordains our suffering but why. The point that has stuck with me over the years was this – suffering isn’t something that happens, nor it is just something God permits. It is instead a vocation, a calling. God does not merely say, “I’m going to make you go through this.” Instead He says, “It is My desire for you that you should go through this. Follow Me.”

All of us, when we are brought into the kingdom, in joyful gratitude for the grace of God, want to do great things for the kingdom. Having been rescued by His glorious grace, we want in turn to rescue others, to serve the body, to proclaim the Good News. God has called us to do just that. He calls out heroes who take the message to strange and foreign lands. He calls out pastors who feed the sheep. He calls out teachers, like my father, who explain to the broader body the fullness of the gospel. Some, however, He calls to suffer.

My wife, for this part of His story, is called to suffer. Her role right now is to do this great thing for the kingdom – to be Jesus to us, so that we might be Jesus to her. She is Jesus to us because as we serve her, we remember His promise, that serving the least of these is serving Him (Matthew 25). We, in turn, are Jesus to her, precisely because the church is His body. When we pray for her, she rests in Jesus’ arms. When we bring a meal, she tastes Jesus feeding her. When we dry her eyes, she feels Jesus wiping away her tears.

Hers is not an easy calling. It is, however, a great one. Being Jesus means walking the via dolorosa.

How blessed I am to walk that road with her, and with Him.

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Broken Bread and Poured Out-Wine

Broken Bread and Poured Out-Wine

It is a dangerous thing to seek the approval of man rather than obedience to Christ. And it is the hallmark of the Laodicean times in which we live.

Consider the words of Oswald Chambers:

Are you willing to be offered for the work of the faithful— to pour out your life blood as a libation on the sacrifice of the faith of others?  Or do you say— “I am not going to be offered up just yet, I do not want God to choose my work.  I want to choose the scenery of my own sacrifice; I want to have the right kind of people watching me and saying, Well done.”

It is one thing to go on the lonely way with dignified heroism, but quite another thing if the line mapped out for you by God means being a door-mat under other people’s feet.  Suppose God wants to teach you to say, “I know how to be abased”— are you ready to be offered up like that?  Are you ready to be not so much as a drop in a bucket— to be so hopelessly insignificant that you are never thought of again in connection with the life you served?  Are you willing to spend and be spent; not seeking to be ministered unto, but to minister?  Some saints cannot do menial work and remain saints because it is beneath their dignity.

For me, the answer is a resounding, Yes!  Come join with me, will you?

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Podcast 228:  A Witness to the Light

Podcast 228: A Witness to the Light

The life and ministry of John the Baptist can be summarized in the opening few verses of John’s gospel. John 1:6-9 states:

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. This man came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all through him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light which gives light to every man coming into the world.

I’ve got a couple of questions. What is the Light? How does he bear witness of that Light? Is it something that only he can do or can I be that witness also? It looks like there is so much more here than meets the eye.

There is. Keep listening.

The following is a study of John 1:6-13.

Download this episode (right click and save)

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