The Sin that Makes God Cry

The Sin that Makes God Cry

Let me give it to you straight— no beating around the bush and no soft-pedaling.  The sin that makes God cry is being committed daily, not by pagan workers of iniquity but by multitudes of Christians— the sin of doubting God’s love for His children.

Do you think it makes God sound too human and vulnerable to say that He cries?  Then ask yourself how a God of love could not cry when His own people doubt His very nature. Jesus Christ was God in the flesh, and according to the book of John He wept when those closest to Him doubted His love and concern.  That was God incarnate at the tomb of Lazarus, crying over friends who failed to recognize who He was.

Time and time again Christ’s dearest associates on this earth doubted His love for them.  Think of the disciples in a storm-tossed boat that was taking on water.  Jesus was in the stern of the boat, sound asleep.  Fearing for their lives, His followers shook Him awake and then accused Him of outright unconcern.  “Master, carest thou not that we perish?” (Mark 4:38).  How their accusation must have grieved the Lord!  That was God Almighty in their boat! How could He not care?  But whenever men take their eyes off the Lord and concentrate instead on their circumstances, doubt always takes over.  Jesus was astounded!  “How can you be afraid when I am with you?  How can you question My love and care?”

Christians today grieve the Lord in this matter even more.  Our unbelief is a greater affront to Him than the unbelief of Mary, Martha, and all the disciples, for our sin is committed against greater light.  We stand on a higher mountain and see more than they could ever see.  We have a completed Bible with a full and detailed record of God’s trustworthiness.  We have the written testimonies of almost twenty centuries of Christians, generation after generation of godly fathers who have passed down to us unshakable proofs of God’s love.  And we have countless personal experiences that testify to God’s tender love and affection for us.

Let us look for His exceeding mercy and love, admit the sinfulness of our unbelief, and recognize who He is!

By David Wilkerson
(May 19, 1931 – April 27, 2011)

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In Honor of My "Short" Little Daughter

In Honor of My "Short" Little Daughter

This classic song, by Randy Newman, is in honor of Haley, my “short” little daughter.  I love you, girl!

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Short people got no reason
Short people got no reason
Short people got no reason
To live

They got little hands
Little eyes
They walk around
Tellin’ great big lies
They got little noses
And tiny little teeth
They wear platform shoes
On their nasty little feet

Well, I don’t want no short people
Don’t want no short people
Don’t want no short people
`Round here

Short people are just the same
As you and I
(A fool such as I)
All men are brothers
Until the day they die
(It’s a wonderful world)

Short people got nobody
Short people got nobody
Short people got nobody
To love

They got little baby legs
That stand so low
You got to pick em up
Just to say hello
They got little cars
That go beep, beep, beep
They got little voices
Goin’ peep, peep, peep
They got grubby little fingers
And dirty little minds
They’re gonna get you every time
Well, I don’t want no short people
Don’t want no short people
Don’t want no short people
‘Round here

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The Fellowship of the Unashamed

The Fellowship of the Unashamed

The following was written by a young man in Rwanda the night before he was murdered for his faith.  In 1980 he was forced to either renounce his faith in Christ or face death.  He chose the latter and was killed on the spot.  His final words, found nailed to a wall in his home, sums up his faith and life and defines the courage that marked the early church and is conspicuously missing today.  Read these words prayerfully and ask the Lord to move His church from lukewarmness to spiritual fervency.

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I am part of the Fellowship of the Unashamed.  I have the Holy Spirit power.  The dye has been cast. I have stepped over the line.  The decision has been made— I am a disciple of His.

I won’t look back, let up, slow down, back away, or be still.
My past is redeemed, my present makes sense, my future is secure.
I’m finished and done with low living, sight walking, smooth knees, colorless dreams, tame visions, worldly-talking, cheap giving, and dwarfed goals.

I no longer need pre-eminence, prosperity, position, promotions, plaudits, or popularity.
I don’t have to be right, first, tops, recognized, praised, regarded or rewarded.
I now live by faith, lean in His presence, walk by patience, am uplifted by prayer and I labor with power.
My face is set, my gait is fast, my goal is heaven, my road is narrow, my way is rough, my companions are few, my Guide is reliable, my mission is clear.

I cannot be bought, compromised, detoured, hired away, turned back, diluted, or delayed.
I will not flinch in the face of sacrifice, hesitate in the presence of the adversity, negotiate at the table of the enemy, pander at the pool of popularity, or meander in the maze of mediocrity.

I won’t give up, shut up, let up, until I have preached up, prayed up, paid up, stored up and stayed up for the cause of Christ.

I am a disciple of Jesus, I must go till He comes, give till I drop, preach till all know and work till He stops me.  And when He comes to claim His own, He’ll have no problems recognizing me.
My banner will be clear!

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What Happened to Our Tears?

What Happened to Our Tears?

The following is from the late David Wilkerson.  I pray you will be moved to repentance at the hardness of your heart as I was mine.

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As I walked up Broadway during rush hour and looked into the faces of the passing crowds, a thought struck my soul like a thunderclap: “Almost every person passing by is going to hell.”

I realize this may come across as harsh or presumptuous.  You might think, “Surely some of those passersby know the Lord.  Certainly many in that massive crowd had seen or experienced religion of some kind.”

With every block I walked, I was hit again and again with the thought: “They’re lost.  They’re going to spend eternity without Jesus!”  Finally,I tried comforting myself with the thought, “But our church has seen thousands of people converted.  Times Square Church is one of the largest congregations in New York City.”

Still, something nagged at my soul.  I had to acknowledge before the Lord, “Oh, Father, I don’t have the burden I once had.  I don’t weep the way I did when I first came to New York City!”

In 1958, Gwen and I were living in Philipsburg, Pennsylvania, a town of around 1,500.  In those days, I would walk into the woods near our home and weep for hours over the souls in New York.  I owned a little green Chevrolet, and each week as I drove to the city to minister, I wept during the entire three-hour drive.

Today I preach in one of the most beautiful theaters in the world, the historic Mark Hellinger Theatre.  Yet, I wonder how many in our congregation and how many reading this feel the way I felt walking up Broadway.  I had to stop and ask myself: “How long has it been since you wept for the lost?  Do you still have the Lord’s burden to reach them with the gospel?”

Are you able to work alongside your colleagues, greet your neighbors, talk to your unsaved family members and never once be concerned for their souls?  Is your mind occupied with simply surviving — providing for your family?  Are you no longer burdened, witnessing, reaching out to the lost and dying world?

“They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.  He that goeth forth and weepeth,bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him” (Psalms 126:5-6).

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