The Lamb of God:  Our Response to Him

The Lamb of God: Our Response to Him

Tuesday Night Bible Study | Wednesday, June 17, 2020

We have spent quite a bit of time exploring what it means for Jesus to be called the “Lamb of God” (John 1:29).  But one question needs to be answered.  If Jesus is “the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world,” including our sin, what is our natural, spiritual, and reasonable response to Him?  In other words, what do we give Jesus in exchange for what He has given us?  Or, what gift or sacrifice is worthy of His gift and sacrifice?  What is our worthy response to the Lamb of God?  And why is that even important?

In Romans 12:1, we find what the “reasonable, natural, and spiritual” response is to the Lamb of God.  And it is based, not on the fear of judgment or condemnation, but the joy of His mercy.  Consider these words:

I beseech (urge, beg) you therefore, brethren, by the (what) mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service. (Romans 12:1)

But how is that done?  In practical terms, how do we present ourselves to Him as a living sacrifice?


What is Our Response to the Lamb of God?

The key to an overabundant spiritual life is not doing, but being.  In essence, it’s not what we do for Him that matters, but what we allow Him to do through us.  And this process is called abiding.

“Abide (rest, dwell, make your home) in Me, and I in you.  As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in Me. I am the vine, you are the branches.  He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing.” (John 15:4-5)

The answer is simple.  But it’s hard to live it out daily in our lives.  Join me as we explore the wonders of responding to the Lamb of God and His love for us.

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Our Latest Posts:

The Lamb of God in Scripture
Jesus: The Lamb as if Slain
How the Name of Jesus is Used in Revelation
Why Do We Do the Things We Do?
Questions to Ask John the Baptist

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The Lamb of God in Scripture

The Lamb of God in Scripture

Tuesday Night Bible Study | Tuesday, June 16, 2020

As we have been discussing, the term “Lamb of God” that John the Baptist used to identify Jesus was not simple guesswork or something he made up.  It was a profound, prophetic revelation given to John by the Holy Spirit at the beginning of the ministry of Jesus.  How do we know that?  Because we can trace the Lamb of God in Scripture from Genesis to Revelation, clearly showing God’s intent to reveal His Son in that way all along.  Let’s once again look at John the Baptist’s proclamation of the coming King.

The next day John saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, “Behold!  The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29).

Again, the next day, John stood with two of his disciples.  And looking at Jesus as He walked, he said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” (John 1:35-36).

Note, this may be the first time Jesus is called the Lamb of God in the New Testament, but we see traces of this revealed in the Old Testament beginning in Genesis 4.


The Lamb of God in Scripture

Consider the thoughts John the Baptist may have had right before he proclaimed Jesus as the “Lamb of God” as he remembered how the phrase was used in Scripture:

In Genesis 4:4 we have the Lamb as a type in the firstlings of a flock slain by Able in sacrifice.

In Genesis 22:8 we have the Lamb prophesied where Abraham says to Isaac, “My son, God will provide (for) Himself a lamb for the burnt offering.”

In Exodus 12 we have the Lamb slain and the blood applied to protect from judgment.

In Isaiah 53:7 we have the Lamb revealed as a person. For the first time, we learn the Lamb would be a Man.

In John 1:29, we have the Lamb identified as Jesus.

In Revelation 5 the Lamb is magnified by all the hosts of heaven.

And in Revelation 22:1, the Lamb is glorified,  seated upon the throne of God.

Let’s unpack this truth together, shall we?

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Our Latest Posts:

Jesus: The Lamb as if Slain
How the Name of Jesus is Used in Revelation
Why Do We Do the Things We Do?
Questions to Ask John the Baptist
Why Do You Cry Out to Me?

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Jesus:  The Lamb as if Slain

Jesus: The Lamb as if Slain


Tuesday Night Bible Study | Monday, June 15, 2020

We have been discussing the phrase used by John the Baptist to herald the coming of Jesus.  In both John 1:29 and 36, John calls Jesus the “Lamb of God.”  We have also traced that phrase throughout the book of Revelation, beginning in chapter 5.  And amazingly, John describes Jesus as a “Lamb as though it had been slain” or as a “Lamb as if slain” (Revelation 5:7).  But what does that phrase mean?  And what are the implications?  Let’s look at the text together:

And I looked, and behold, in the midst of the throne and of the four living creatures, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as though it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent out into all the earth.  Then He came and took the scroll out of the right hand of Him who sat on the throne.  Now when He had taken the scroll, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each having a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. (Revelation 5:6-8).


The Lamb as if Slain

Later in the same chapter, we see Jesus identified, once again, as the “Lamb.”  Not Christ, not Son of God nor the Son of Man, not even Messiah.  But simply, the “Lamb.”

Then I looked, and I heard the voice of many angels around the throne, the living creatures, and the elders; and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands, saying with a loud voice:

“Worthy is the Lamb who was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom, and strength and honor and glory and blessing!”

And every creature which is in heaven and on the earth and under the earth and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, I heard saying:

“Blessing and honor and glory and power be to Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, forever and ever!”

But this is only the beginning.  We will soon discover the identification of Jesus as a “Lamb” runs all through the book of Revelation.  Did you ever wonder why?  What is the Lord trying to say to us?

Let’s dig a bit deeper into the description of John, a “Lamb as if slain.”

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Our Latest Posts:

How the Name of Jesus is Used in Revelation
Why Do We Do the Things We Do?
Questions to Ask John the Baptist
Why Do You Cry Out to Me?
Our Great Defender

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How the Name of Jesus is Used in Revelation

How the Name of Jesus is Used in Revelation


Tuesday Night Bible Study | Friday, June 12, 2020

As we look at the name John the Baptist calls Jesus in John 1:29 and 36 (the Lamb of God), and compare it to how the name of Jesus is used in Revelation, several key points quickly come to the surface.  For example, when we see Jesus referred to as “Jesus” or “Jesus Christ” in Revelation, it is usually associated with an attribute or characteristic of Jesus, and not as a description of His person.

In other words, John uses phrases like the “testimony of Jesus” (Rev. 1:2, 9; 12:17; 19:10), or the “witness of Jesus” (Rev. 20:4), or the “patience of Jesus” (Rev. 9), or even the “faith of Jesus” (Rev. 14:12), to describe something associated with Jesus the person, but not as a term describing Jesus as a person.


The Name of Jesus in Revelation

The descriptive phrase John uses to describe Jesus in Revelation is the same phrase John the Baptist uses to introduce Him to the world in John 1:29.  And that phrase is “Lamb of God” or, simply “Lamb.”  Consider the following:

And I looked, and behold,  in the midst of the throne and of the four living creatures, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as though it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent out into all the earth. (Revelation 5:6).

This is a description of Jesus the person.

Now I saw when the Lamb opened one of the seals; and I heard one of the four living creatures saying with a voice like thunder, “Come and see.” (Revelation 6:1).

Again, John is describing Jesus as the person opening one of the seals, and not one of His attributes.  And He calls Him the “Lamb”.

Take a moment and do a quick Bible search and look at how often John refers to Jesus as the “Lamb” in Revelation and then ask yourself, Why?  Could there be more to this than what it seems like on the surface?  And how did John the Baptist know to call Jesus the “Lamb of God”?

This is just a sneak-peek into all the Lord has for us to learn about Him in this wonderous name of Jesus, the “Lamb of God.”  Keep listening to find out more.

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Our Latest Posts:

Why Do We Do the Things We Do?
Questions to Ask John the Baptist
Why Do You Cry Out to Me?
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Why Do We Do the Things We Do?

Why Do We Do the Things We Do?


Tuesday Night Bible Study | Thursday, June 11, 2020

Why do we do the things we do?  That’s a great question that often leads to defending ourselves and our actions.  But it was never that way with Jesus.  In fact, Jesus never gave us a reason for what He did.  He never suffered from the why do we do the things we do mental hangover as others often do?  No, He simply did what was right and pleasing in His Father’s sight (1 Tim. 2:3).  After all, one of the fundamental tenets of Jesus’ life and ministry can be summed up in this simple phrase:

“For I have come down from heaven, not to do My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me.” (John 6:38)

So when we look at some actions by Jesus that seem, in our eyes, to be out of character or somewhat questionable, we must realize we cannot judge the Son of God by the standards of fallen man.  We cannot ask the Lord, “Why do You do the things You do?”  As Paul said, “But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God (or to question His judgment and motives)?” (Rom. 9:20).


Why Do We Do the Things We Do?

But often we find events in His Word that we, if in the Lord’s shoes, might have done differently.  After all, why wait two additional days before returning to Bethany to raise Lazarus from the dead (John 11:6)?  Or why speak so harshly to a woman begging for healing for her demon-possessed daughter (Matt. 15:22-23)?  Or why, when Jesus saw His disciples struggling in the storm, does it say He “would have passed them by” (Mark 6:48)?  Doesn’t that seem cold to just walk on by while Your disciples struggle?  But He must have had a reason, although it is not revealed to us in Scripture.

The same can be said of what we know about His relationship with John the Baptist after the baptism.  On the surface, it seems a bit callous.  We see Jesus “coming towards” John (John 1:29) and yet He doesn’t stop to speak to John at all.  And then later, two of John’s disciples follow Jesus but John does not and Jesus never invites him to (John 1:37).  Wonder why?

And then there is the statement made by Jesus about John the Baptist after those sent from John had departed (Matt. 11:7).  It was almost like Jesus intentionally didn’t want John to know the wonderful things He said about Him.  Again, wonder why?

Remember, it is learning how to ask these kinds of questions that will grow your experience in His Word to depths you may have never been before.  So join with us as we strive together to experience His Word.

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Our Latest Posts:

Questions to Ask John the Baptist
Why Do You Cry Out to Me?
Our Great Defender
Trust and Abide, Come What May
The Road Less Traveled

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